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MrIdaho
12-24-2014, 01:08 PM
Yesterday I started the installation of my front wheels on my T-bucket project. I will post some pics come the weekend showing my approach to attaching the 3/4" axles to the kingpins. Using sealed bearings instead of the head-tubes off of a doaner bike as well.
Anyway, I started measuring to get the control arms pointed straight and determining ackerman angles and mounting of dis calipers when it occurred to me that maybe, just maybe the axles are not perfectly parallel with the frame and each other thus leading to a positive or negative camber.
Did some measuring and find the wheels are 3/4" farther apart where they contact the ground thus having positive camber. DANG it I thought I was careful when I welded my control arms and axle tubes using a HF angle gauge.
Need to measure from a mid point on the front frame member if both axles are out of plane (90 degrees in relation to kingpins).
Well using sketch-up I find that the axles are at or less than .5 degrees out of plane.
CAMBER has some effect on the steering and cornering of said vehicle but I will correct what ever axle is off the most.
Moral of the story - an angle gauge is good for some things but not accurate in this instance.
Curious how many Zombies have measured the camber on their builds??
Camber also has an effect on Tire wear and road resistance.

Twinkle
12-24-2014, 05:22 PM
Curious how many Zombies have measured the camber on their builds??
Camber also has an effect on Tire wear and road resistance.
I do for one , I set EVERYTHING at 90 degrees with the steering straight ahead , using a 20x50 mm tube as a reference and clamp the brake arms parallel , before welding the lugs to the head tubes ( after I weld the head tubes to the cross member

regards emma

firebat45
02-22-2016, 11:56 AM
If your tires are farther apart at the ground than the top, that's negative camber, not positive. 3/4" is way too much for a T-bucket though.

Camber on a trike doesn't make a huge difference to the tires, as long as it's less than 20 degrees or so. Bike tires are designed for leaning anyways.

DannyC
02-22-2016, 03:52 PM
Although I did my best on my trike by securing my axle-tabs with nuts and washers on a length of 16mm Studding a degree of error crept in somehow.
Luckily, it didn't seem to affect road handling last summer. But with limited workshop space these crucial elements are never going to be easy I think.

But, my next trike will be perfect, honest!