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hiyawathen
11-24-2013, 12:49 AM
Practiced welding some 16 gage tubing today...used 1/16" E6013 rod with dc inverter stick welder @ 40amps. When viewing the pics...please remember this is the first time I've ever struck an arc.

http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/11/24/e6ypetap.jpg

http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/11/24/qyhavy2u.jpg

http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/11/24/mabybe4a.jpg

http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/11/24/anejamah.jpg

Any good tips for better looking welds? Should I go bigger rod or try a diiferent type rod or...?

Thanks,
Dave

darnthedog
11-24-2013, 01:03 AM
The welds look pretty cold to me. Is this your practice or project?
Need to grind them down and see if you got penetration. Most of that appears to be stuck to the top and too each other. Not quite melting the base. Looks like a lot of false starts and not much flow.
I'm no expert but that how my first welds looked. Had to turn up the heat and slow my movement to allow the puddle to form. Also if you don't get good penetration the project will fall apart when you least expect it. Hope that helps.

hiyawathen
11-24-2013, 01:53 AM
Practice, I cut up a bunch of pieces for a timberwolf project and this is some of the leftover steel to practice on. I want to get better at welding first before I actually start trying to build the real frames. I figured if I was gonna learn how to weld, might as well start with the same materials used in the plans. Should I increase amps or slow down the travel of the electrode? Seems like I needed to move quickly or the edges of the metal would melt further apart...or is it just an optical illusion? Seems like the electrodes burn into the work quite rapidly ...is this normal? I think I used 10 to 12 electrodes in this first practice.

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Tradetek
11-24-2013, 01:58 AM
Sit down and spend some quality time with ChuckE2009 and WeldingTipsAndTricks on YouTube.com.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=akvv4ApYMVE


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7RLMw9d0rqE

You will learn a lot from both of them.

Bill

hiyawathen
11-24-2013, 02:21 AM
Cool, thanks Dtd and Bill, I'll watch the vids and compare speed, my guess would be I was moving too quickly...I don't think I ever saw a "puddle"...I'll remeber that when I practice again!

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stormbird
11-24-2013, 04:16 AM
Hi there

Everyone has to start somewhere , and like a race just getting to the start line is an achievement in it's own right.

Look here :-

http://www.mig-welding.co.uk/arc-tutorial.htm

They have some excellent tutorials and also print out the page Common Faults and have it with you when you weld.

Cut the scrap you have into small pieces say 2" long and attempt to weld them back together , with them being short you can look inside at the joint and see what penetration you got.

The joint you show is one of the harder one's to master the inside and outside corner both have their challenges and you will find them hard until you have some mastery over the easier flat butt welds.


Also you need to pound a few of your test joints with a hammer so you have an idea how much trust you can put in them.

Then it is just practice , practice and more practice.

Wightman
11-24-2013, 05:35 AM
I'm a newbie to welding also, and will share a couple of points that have helped me improve (not perfect :goofy:) my welds. The first is practice running beads, not joining metal. the second is listen to the welding, if you can get it to sound like frying bacon then your power setting is in the general area required.

The final point is more to do with technique rather than anything else. When you first start, there are lots of sparks and the adrenaline is flowing quicker than the metal, you wave the rod (or wire) around and lose all sense of deliberate direction and control. This is the whole point of practicing on single bits of metal before joining two, you have to know what to expect and let it become "the norm" Looking through the mask and thinking through what you should be doing, both need to unite.

go1000go
11-24-2013, 06:14 AM
Hi Dave,
Welcome and good on you for posting your pictures, helps a lot to be able to see as you see.


The final point is more to do with technique rather than anything else. When you first start, there are lots of sparks and the adrenaline is flowing quicker than the metal, you wave the rod (or wire) around and lose all sense of deliberate direction and control. This is the whole point of practicing on single bits of metal before joining two, you have to know what to expect and let it become "the norm" Looking through the mask and thinking through what you should be doing, both need to unite.

Wrightman, liking the words, after fours years of this crazy hobby, not sure I have lost the adrenaline, but it is more under control.

Practice, practice practice is the name of the game, try different settings to be able to understand the effects.
The one thing that will work against you is the desire to get started on your timberwolf, my suggestion to this desire is to make something that will help in your workshop, simple stand/ jig or a trolley for your welder, anything to get the practice in.

Good luck and enjoy, keep posting the photos.

stormbird
11-24-2013, 06:45 AM
Hi there

Also see if you can find a local course to teach you the basics , I had 12 weeks of TIG night class , it seemed a lot of money at the time [ about 150 ] but I had someone showing me how to weld watched me weld and I was using their gas/tungsten & material.

It would have cost me a lot more than that to get that number of hours under my belt at home , also it seemed easier to find 3 hours once a week for the course than to try and do 3 hours at home.

Wightman
11-24-2013, 07:29 AM
it seemed easier to find 3 hours once a week for the course than to try and do 3 hours at home.t

Haha, ain't that the truth, can find time to twiddle me thumbs in a supermarket aisle when out shopping with the missus, yet don't have time to scratch me bum at home, how does that work? :rolleyes:

trikeman
11-24-2013, 10:01 AM
The welds look cold to me, as well. That usually means you need to crank up the amps, or move more slowly. I think the thing that helped me the most when I started was intentionally burning holes and watching what the metal looks like when you do. its critical to learn to see the puddle and what molten metal on the base vs just laying down a caterpillar looks like. Watching videos where they used a good filter, so I could see what the puddle and the process looked like was also very helpful.

trikeman
11-24-2013, 10:27 AM
Hiawathen - which plans do you have, and what do you want in a bike (speed, comfort, easy build, etc)?

Radical Brad
11-24-2013, 10:37 AM
You will be proficient before you know it!

Try this...

Whatever setting you used to make the weld in the photos, add 50% to the dial. So if you had 45 amps, go up to around 68 amps.
Now run a straight bead right down the center of that cold weld traveling at about 1 inch in 4 seconds, holding the rod at about 45 degrees to the tube.

See what comes of that.

Brad

ChadClancy
11-24-2013, 03:03 PM
One thing I find I have to do when I'm welding real thin stuf like this is to take a very quick pass that does nothing more than get a little bit of weld down right along the joint. This seems to help in avoiding burning lots of holes in the joint on the "real" first pass. I think that little bit of filler metal acts as a bit of a heat sink so the base material is not getting burnt away. The same thing goes for starting to fill a hole where you have to start off by moving pretty fast until you get a bead going around the rim or you'll just keep enlarging the hole.

The good thing about welding is that usually if it looks good, it is good. You just have to know what to look for. You dont want to see convex blobs of weld just sitting on top of the metal.

trikeman
11-24-2013, 05:08 PM
One other thing that has been mentioned here many times in other threads, is that once you get the heat turned up enough, but don't want to burn too many holes, you need to only weld an inch or so before letting things cool down.

hiyawathen
11-24-2013, 07:03 PM
Cool...thanks everyone! I've watched the vids and I'm moving at warp speed with the rod compared to the vids...so I definitely need to slow down some. I'll give it another go next weekend and report back my progress. Thanks for taking the time to look at my practice and responding back so quickly!!

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hiyawathen
11-24-2013, 07:15 PM
Trikeman, I bought the six pack deal a while back...I picked up the timberwolf, warrior, spirit, street fighter, tomahawk and overkill. Once I master sticking metal together, I plan to build a pair of timberwolves...(Dad is retired and I thought if I got him hooked on building, it would help us get in shape...he loves working the recumbent machine at the gym, so what could be better? How about a recumbent machine that goes places...LOL!! Plus it gives me an excuse to come over and hang out with him.)

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hiyawathen
02-13-2014, 10:06 PM
Still practicing!! Started welding end caps for my upcoming timberwolves...also fixed Dad's sander by welding a new cam on one of the adjusters that was broken. I'm hooked now!

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FrankCrank
02-13-2014, 10:32 PM
.....nice one, good to hear you've caught the bug!

darnthedog
02-14-2014, 12:05 AM
Cool to hear- so has your Dad caught the bug with you?
Be sure to post photos we love to watch

pedals
02-14-2014, 07:05 AM
That looks very similar to my first weld. I found the best way to get info on welding is to do what everyone on this forum does. Type in welding and theres hundreds of webpages youtubes etc. I think there would be very very few profesional welders here so go on give it a go.
pedals

hiyawathen
02-15-2014, 11:45 AM
Dtd, yep!!, Dad's been busy truing up all the tubing I cut the last time I was over and found a 90 degree metal clamp jig to aid in our build process of the rear frames

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