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View Full Version : Anyone here use the Longevity Stick 140?



Pedal Pusher
11-10-2013, 03:14 PM
This will be my 1st welder. I'm looking at the HF 80amp 110 vs Longevity Stick 140 vs Lincoln AC 225S. I like the fact that the Longevity can be run off 110 or 220 unlike the HF or the Lincoln and is more portable than the Lincoln. Almost all my welding will be outside and I really want to stay with a stick welder.
Any input would be appreciated.

MrIdaho
11-10-2013, 04:41 PM
Using a stick welder is doable for building bikes but a mig is a much better choice and easier to use on thin material.
Most members are using a mig or tig instead of stick.

trikeman
11-10-2013, 08:17 PM
I agree with MrIdaho that most members are probably using MIG (many of them are just using flux core, so its not truly MIG). Its easier for beginners to lay down a weld with a wired feeder (either flux core of true MIG). TIG is too expensive for my wallet and the few hours of actual hood time I put in a year building a few bikes. I started with a 110v Hobart Handler, then moved up to a 230V Lincoln MIG (using CO2 as my gas). When I got my old beat up Miller Thunderbolt AC/DC and my Oxy-Acetylene torches, I decided I had too many welders. By that time I had realized that once you learn to weld, they are all good machines. It was a tough choice, but I sold my MIG and kept the stick and oxy-ace units. I guess that reflects my preferences once you learn to weld. MIGs are faster, so if I was in a production environment making stuff all day, I would probably be using one still.

I would rather buy a used Hobart, Lincoln, or Miller machine than some of the new HF ones, simply because I think they will probably last longer (they are build like tanks), but I haven't owned a HF one and I know a lot of guys like the HF ones. I have seen some pretty impressive videos on the HF Invertor 80A stick welders for thin work, and would not mind owning one. I welder I respect (ChuckE2000) on YT seems to hold the Longevity equipment in high regard.

Pedal Pusher
11-10-2013, 08:33 PM
Your experience is one of the reasons I want to stay with a stick welder. Almost all of my welding will be outside (wind issues for shielding gas) and once I learn to weld good with a stick welder I should be able to use it for many other projects and repairs. I have heard more than a few say they liked MIG better at first but eventually ended up welding mostly with stick welders. I also like the simplicity of stick units. Do you have an opinion on that Longevity unit? I can probably pick up a used Lincoln tombstone unit at a decent price but their not very portable, tho I hear they last forever.

darnthedog
11-10-2013, 08:51 PM
If you have a Longivity dealer locally go for it.

trikeman
11-10-2013, 08:52 PM
Your experience is one of the reasons I want to stay with a stick welder. Almost all of my welding will be outside (wind issues for shielding gas) and once I learn to weld good with a stick welder I should be able to use it for many other projects and repairs. I have heard more than a few say they liked MIG better at first but eventually ended up welding mostly with stick welders. I also like the simplicity of stick units. Do you have an opinion on that Longevity unit? I can probably pick up a used Lincoln tombstone unit at a decent price but their not very portable, tho I hear they last forever.

I have never used a Longevity welder, so other than watching ChuckE's videos, I don't know anything about them. I agree with you that the old tombstone Lincolns and mine and Brad's thunderbolts are very heavy. Mine weighs about 100 pounds. I built a cart for mine with those big 8" rubber tires from Harbor Freight, so I could wheel it around. I was also lucky that the one I bought of Craigslist came with some 50 foot leads with copper as big as your finger (probably worth more than the $200 I paid for the welder), so I can pretty much leave the welder in a spot on my back porch and weld in the backyard when I want to. I will say that DC welds smoother on the sticks, so I think its worth the extra $50 you usually have to spend on a used one to get an AC/DC, if you are going that route. That said, Brad seems to have no trouble with his AC only unit. I agree with you on the simplicity, and I also weld only outside, so that affects my choices.

Tradetek
11-11-2013, 01:31 AM
I personally like the size of my Lincoln inverter and find that it is very easy to use for stick welding using 7014 rod which is supposed to be good for beginner's but has less spatter than 6013.

I also recommend watching ChuckE2009's channel on youtube, along with weldingtipsandtricks. I do find that even though Lanse (ChuckE2009) is young, his presentation is great and the info that he provides is really good for us hobbyists... that being said, you will notice that he never uses the Longevity welder he was given to do stick welding, and that he only kept the Longevity Pro MTS multi-process machine as well as ForceCut 42i Plasma cutter that he was given after he gave a honest review of the welder laying out all of the quality control issues and problems getting support from Longevity. Shortly thereafter, he did another video talking about how after that video, and the back and forth that went on at the forum's over at weldingweb.com, that Longevity bent over backwards to resolve most of his problems and then told him he didn't need to return any of the equipment they had given him to review. He does use the Pro MTS to do some MIG welding, but it seems that he only uses it for tack welds, and he occaisionally pulls out the ForceCut 42i (which from everything I have heard does seem to be a decent plasma cutter).

He generally uses a Hobart Stickmate (http://www.amazon.com/s/?_encoding=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&field-keywords=hobart%20stickmate&linkCode=ur2&sprefix=hobart%20sti%2Caps%2C164&tag=inm06-20&url=search-alias%3Dtools). If you live in the midwest you get them locally at Tractor Supply stores, and the Hobart brand seems to be the retail brand for Miller and has the added note that they are made in America which seems to be more important to me as I get older...

Bill

Pedal Pusher
11-11-2013, 04:22 AM
I personally like the size of my Lincoln inverter and find that it is very easy to use for stick welding using 7014 rod which is supposed to be good for beginner's but has less spatter than 6013.

I also recommend watching ChuckE2009's channel on youtube, along with weldingtipsandtricks. I do find that even though Lanse (ChuckE2009) is young, his presentation is great and the info that he provides is really good for us hobbyists... that being said, you will notice that he never uses the Longevity welder he was given to do stick welding, and that he only kept the Longevity Pro MTS multi-process machine as well as ForceCut 42i Plasma cutter that he was given after he gave a honest review of the welder laying out all of the quality control issues and problems getting support from Longevity. Shortly thereafter, he did another video talking about how after that video, and the back and forth that went on at the forum's over at weldingweb.com, that Longevity bent over backwards to resolve most of his problems and then told him he didn't need to return any of the equipment they had given him to review. He does use the Pro MTS to do some MIG welding, but it seems that he only uses it for tack welds, and he occaisionally pulls out the ForceCut 42i (which from everything I have heard does seem to be a decent plasma cutter).

He generally uses a Hobart Stickmate (http://www.amazon.com/s/?_encoding=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&field-keywords=hobart%20stickmate&linkCode=ur2&sprefix=hobart%20sti%2Caps%2C164&tag=inm06-20&url=search-alias%3Dtools). If you live in the midwest you get them locally at Tractor Supply stores, and the Hobart brand seems to be the retail brand for Miller and has the added note that they are made in America which seems to be more important to me as I get older...

Bill
Thanks for the info everyone. I will check out ChuckE2009 videos. I live in California and have a Tractor Supply a few miles from my house so I will check out the Hobarts. Thanks again, further input is always welcome. I may take a welding class at the local junior college, probably the fastest way to learn.

Pedal Pusher
11-18-2013, 10:46 PM
I just found a used Lincoln 225/125 AC/DC stick welder for $200.00 I think I should jump on it. What do you guys think?

trikeman
11-18-2013, 10:50 PM
I think you are right - jump on it, if it is good condition

Tradetek
11-18-2013, 11:36 PM
If it is the one in Modesto for $200 on Craigslist, I'd say it looks like it is in pristine condition and for $299 plus tax, with some rods it's a good deal.

I'd just recommend having him show you that it welds before taking it.

Note that ChuckE2009 has a video add scratch start tig to a welder like this one, if not this same one. So you have some flexibility to upgrade in the future for the cost of the parts which do NOT require any changes to the machine itself.

Bill

Pedal Pusher
11-23-2013, 10:50 PM
Well that welder was gone. However I found another Lincoln 225/125 AC/DC for only $125.00 and I got it today. I also picked up a Hobart variable shade auto dimming helmet on clearance from my local Tractor Supply for $48.00. Then I was in my local Home Depot and found a Ryobi 4 1/2 inch angle grinder for $29.00. I guess I have no more excuses, I need to start practicing.

darnthedog
11-24-2013, 12:56 AM
If it works then I think you got a better deal for the AC/DC machine. It would make a nice scratch Tig unit and would even be able to play with any metal you want to try once you get the hang of it. ChuckE2009 would show you how if your really desire to build it in to a Tig unit. But as a Stick unit it will give you quite a bit of capability as well. Hope you got a 220V source. A dryer is too small if you get too high in the amperage when welding you'll pop the breaker all the time if it is like my 20 amp service. So what are you going to build with your new welder?

Pedal Pusher
11-24-2013, 01:47 AM
Our dryer outlet is 40 amp and at full DC output the welder only draws 36 amps. It works great in all modes, DC+, DC-, and AC. After some practice I am going to build a welding table then try my hand at the Overkill Chopper. If that turns out well I will probably build a warrior trike. I have had the plans for both for quite a few years. It's time to quite procrastinating.

Pedal Pusher
11-24-2013, 02:29 AM
On second thought I might try the marauder low racer as a first build. I have 5 plans. Decisions, decisions. Enough daydreaming I need to gain skills with the welder.

trikeman
11-24-2013, 10:14 AM
I have used my Miller Thunderbolt AC/DC 230v on my dryer outlet for years now and never even popped the 40 Amp breaker. I have even turned it up all the way to 225 Amps and used it to cut metal without a problem. The worst that can happen is it pops the breaker open, so I say go for it.

darnthedog
11-24-2013, 10:48 AM
Lucky guys- my home is only 20 amps for the dryer outlet and the breaker box is on the opposite side of the house from the garage. When I picked up my first welder it was an AC arc welder built by air products. At 30 amps it popped the breaker. Rewire to bring a 220v 40-60 amps will cost me a pretty $1000 bill if I do it myself and $2k or more to hire someone. 6 to 8 gauge wire is through the roof in cost.
Anyway have fun learning to arc and spark on metal. Be sure to let the metal cool a while before handling it. Yes it can burning fingers through your welding gloves.

trikeman
11-24-2013, 11:27 AM
By the way, I don't really recommend cutting metal with your stick. I did it just to see if I could, but it was like flying too close to the sun. Talk about a heat source! There was lots of molten metal falling off and a roar like a jet engine. If you ever try it, make sure you have some place for that molten metal to go besides on your feet. I put mine on the grill of an old BBQ shell that I keep around as a shield for grinding and cutting steel. I think the roar was from the steam coming off the rods that I soaked in water for 15 mins, like someone recommended.

Pedal Pusher
11-24-2013, 10:38 PM
LOL I have a 7in and a 4 1/2 in angle grinder as well as a chop saw. That should cover any cutting I need to do.👍