PDA

View Full Version : Electric assist Deltawolf Velomobile



TexasTuff
06-28-2013, 05:59 PM
i didn't know exactly what catagory to put this under but since my ultimate goal is a velomobile, I put it here under "Velomobile".

My son, David, and i built this DeltaWolf a couple of years ago and it became my main ride for a long time. I always had plans to make a velomobile of it but you know the best made plans story. I then built a suspended Spirit and i loved it. i then ran across a deal i couldn't pass up on a Vision R40 and have been riding it for some time.

I had sat my DeltaWolf aside for several reason. It's been living outside and has suffered somewhat from the elements. Someone recently gave me a hub motor. I tested it out using a couple of car batteries and it worked fine. I though it might be a good fit for the DeltaWolf and then finish the velomobile cover.

So today, in the Texas heat and humidity the project is reborn. The hub motor is laced to a 20" rim so I put it on the front of the DeltaWolf, used a couple of batteries borrowed from onsite vehicles and hard wired a on/off switch and DeltaWolf made it's maiden voyage down the long drive to the street and back.

As the heat hit 101 and my tools got to hot to handle and the shade moved from my work area, I quit for the day. I just ordered a new chain (old one rusted) and a couple of 20 ah SLA batteries. Hope to have it back on the road soon.

No pictures until I make a trip to town and get a new memory card for the camera. (don't ask)

George

Ticktock
06-29-2013, 08:45 AM
Sounds like another interesting project under way. Glad to see that you have the priorities correct---get memory card before starting work. You have been well trained/indoctrinated/ brainwashed etc etc.
Look forward to see results, as I can see the same thing happening here with our winters.
Steve G

FlatBlack
06-29-2013, 11:20 AM
Hi George,

My Delta Wolf experience has been similar: My sons and I built one a while back and although it did not sit outside, after the thrill of the build it did not get much use. The addition of a front hub motor and fairing changed that. It's remarkable how much utility and fun I get from it now.

I'll be interested in seeing how you approach the problem of full enclosure.

Cheers,
Bill

bambuko
06-29-2013, 12:44 PM
Be interesting to see how well the hub motor works on a front wheel?
I found that hub motors are fine on the flat, but very disappointing when you need them most ie going uphill.
And... if my LWB experience is anything to go by, there is little load on the front wheel, falling to very little when going uphill, so I would expect lot of spinning and little traction?

Hope it works OK for you.

TexasTuff
06-29-2013, 04:12 PM
Well, here is where things stand now. This may be where things stand till tomorrow morning. I just came in to cool off a bit. Only 96 today, much cooler than yesterday, but still hot.

I have everything functional on the trike again. New chain, RD and new front tire on the new hub motor rim. Its temporally wired with an on off switch, the controller is toast. Full power or nothing. I have no specs of this motor other than the controller says that it is a 24v controller. Batteries will be in next week and I'll decide if its worth investing in a new controller or not. Sometimes free things are not free.

I may take it on the road late this afternoon on 24 volts. Yesterday I just took it up and down my sand and gravel drive which is about 3/8 of a mile. I was only running it on 12 volts yesterday and it was fine. I have it on 24 volts now and I'll see how it does. Yesterday I didn't have a chain on it and didn't want to stray too far from home.

Ticktock, pictures will come with my next trip to town, that trip may be on my electric assist trike. That's the plan. To Walmart and back = 25 miles. I hope that 20 ah @ 24 v will help get me there and back.

FlatBlack, I've already built the frame for a skin on frame velomobile but there is a problem. Ingress/egress is not very easy for a old man. I plan to either cut the frame and make one half where it tilts or change the size of the hole. I also may rebuild it completely. Part of the problem is the OSS being too high. I could make the velo smaller/lower if I changed to USS and would also make ingress/egress easier. I've not ordered the Dacron yet, waiting to see how much I need.l

bambuko, I hope wheel spin is controllable but ready to live with it if its not. It wasn't bad yesterday, but like I said I was only running it on 12 volts.

I think I'm finished for today, it will be cooler in the morning.

bambuko
06-29-2013, 05:13 PM
...bambuko, I hope wheel spin is controllable but ready to live with it if its not. It wasn't bad yesterday, but like I said I was only running it on 12 volts...
If you are doing it on the flat I do not expect problem, it's hills and starting uphill that might cause grief - and judging by looking at google map you are pretyy flat at Edgewood, Texas :cheesy:

Pat Eaton
06-29-2013, 07:59 PM
I have been riding a Deltawolf velo with a 9c front hub and 48v home built battery.

Just over 4,000 km on the bike. Speeds up to 50km/hr on full battery, my commute requires at 3 minute climb up a 10 percent grade on asphalt.

Very rarely get wheel spin even with a 30 amp controller. The batteries are placed forward to balance the bike.

Body is made of coro and water pipe.

TexasTuff
06-29-2013, 09:14 PM
Hi Pat, nice to hear from you again. I remember your velomobile well. I have a picture of your first one on my blog. Good to see you are still getting service from it.
If you have a picture of where you mounted the batteries I would like to see. I thought about that this afternoon but I don't want to get too much weight on the front wheel.
I'll have mine rolling next week when the batteries come in and maybe with the velo body a couple of weeks later.


Thanks
George

FlatBlack
06-29-2013, 11:23 PM
Living in Appalachia, I have lots of experience with hills and can say unequivocally that the performance of my front hub motor Wolf is anything but “disappointing”. Like Pat, I mounted the battery up front. I do have to pedal on the steepest hills, but spinning on anything but snow and ice is simply not a problem.

I also have installed a front hub motor kit on a homebuilt LWB recumbent and even with the battery mounted up front, if you are aggressive with the throttle upon starting, the wheel will spin regardless of tire tread design or surface. My kids love this feature. It still gets me up hills but not as securely as my trike.

Another problem I noticed with my electric LWB recumbent is that the hub motor/battery up front deal seems to magnify the quirky steering associated with these bikes (at least the ones that I have built). Perhaps it's just my ineptitude, but each time I ride this critter I need to recalibrate myself to steering dynamics.

Cheers,
Bill

bambuko
06-30-2013, 06:03 AM
Living in Appalachia, I have lots of experience with hills and can say unequivocally that the performance of my front hub motor Wolf is anything but “disappointing”. Like Pat, I mounted the battery up front. I do have to pedal on the steepest hills, but spinning on anything but snow and ice is simply not a problem.
Without knowing:
bike weight
your weight
motor power
battery spec and weight
unfortunately your experience is of limited value to me as a piece of information...
For example - I also have an e-bike and my wife is very happy with it's performance, I on the other hand am totally disappointed - given everything else being equal, the clue is in our respective weights.
So you being very satisfied with your Wolf doesn't guarantee that everybody else would also be happy.
Pity, since your Appalachia experience is of great interest indeed!



I also have installed a front hub motor kit on a homebuilt LWB recumbent and even with the battery mounted up front, if you are aggressive with the throttle upon starting, the wheel will spin regardless of tire tread design or surface. My kids love this feature. It still gets me up hills but not as securely as my trike.
I am guessing again (without info about motor power and weight distribution front/rear on both the trike and LWB), that this is likely to do with front wheel being very lightly loaded. Your trike being better might be nothing to do with it being trike and a lot more to do with CofG position and front axle loading.


Another problem I noticed with my electric LWB recumbent is that the hub motor/battery up front deal seems to magnify the quirky steering associated with these bikes (at least the ones that I have built). Perhaps it's just my ineptitude, but each time I ride this critter I need to recalibrate myself to steering dynamics.
Yes, that doesn't surprise me at all - my LWB was also very sensitive to CofG position (until I got it right)

FlatBlack
06-30-2013, 10:16 AM
Thank you so much for your thorough analysis of my comments bambuko, but my intention was not to help you but rather provide some balance to others to your original response to George putting a front hub motor on his trike. Thank you Pat for also responding.

My electric wolf is described in the delta wolf section of our forum.

Cheers,
Bill

bambuko
06-30-2013, 10:32 AM
...but my intention was not to help...
All postings here are helpful to those reading them even if this wasn't the original intention of the poster :cheesy:


... My electric wolf is described in the delta wolf section of our forum. ... Bill
Is this (http://forum.atomiczombie.com/showthread.php/6710-Delta-Wolf-changing?p=62936&highlight=#post62936) the thread you are referring to?
or... should I continue searching?

Radical Brad
06-30-2013, 10:35 AM
I electrified my Wolf as well and found it to be huge fun.
Wheel spin was never seen, even on steep hills, and I overvolted my motor for huge torque.

http://atomiczombie.com/temp/ewolf.jpg

Brad

TexasTuff
06-30-2013, 10:41 AM
I electrified my Wolf as well and found it to be huge fun.
Wheel spin was never seen, even on steep hills, and I overvolted my motor for huge torque.
Brad
I'm glad to see you have what appears to be the same fork as mine. I was somewhat concerned about that.

bambuko
06-30-2013, 11:21 AM
I electrified my Wolf as well...
So perhaps you can tell me what motor you have fitted? (I am limited to 250 watts)
If I recall your weight is about half of mine? (alternatively, and perhaps better - can you please tell me what is the combined weight of bike, motor, battery and rider?)
And hills - can you please tell me what do you consider "steep" - 10% or 20% (have you tried 25% ?), because this is what I am faced with :rolleyes4:

and ps

...overvolted my motor for huge torque...
It's not the torque I am concerned about, but front axle loading - it is fairly common for FWD to have issues starting uphill.
If you have all the weight on back wheels and very little on the front, then however much torque you have from the motor in the front wheel, you will not be going anywhere.

TexasTuff
06-30-2013, 11:39 AM
Like Pat, I mounted the battery up front. I do have to pedal on the steepest hills, but spinning on anything but snow and ice is simply not a problem.
Cheers,
Bill
For aesthetics I had ruled out mounting the batteries up front, I guess I'll have to reconsider again. I guess aesthetics won't make as much difference after the velo body in on.

I'll weigh all the responses and use the ones that best fit my situation.

Thanks
George

Radical Brad
06-30-2013, 12:50 PM
Sure, but instead let's look at my electrified LodeRunner Tandem, which used the same motor up front.

With 3 people on the bike (2 legitimate riders and one on the rear cargo box), I estimate a total weight of about 500 pounds total. I had the trike out at a campsite called Kakabeka Falls, which has a 2 mile long hill with a massive slope of probably 20%-25%. You know, the kind of hill that has sand depots every few hundred feet and most walk their bikes up.

We would routinely bomb up this hill under mostly motor power, and even on the spots where it was gravel from being repaired, there was no slipping of the drive motor that I could tell. I ran a mostly treadless tire on the drive motor.

My hubmotor was also limited due to regulations, and originally had a 450 watt rating and a top speed of about 25 MPH, but by adding an extra cell to make 48 volts, the motor is more like 600 watts and can do about 35 MPH now. I am a 99% law abiding citizen, but proudly break the laws regarding rated motor wattage because it is a stupid and meaningless law contrived by slack jawed troglodytes with too much time on their hands. Change the wattage sticker and follow the rules of the road.... problem solved.

The only time I had a mechanical failure was when I was silly enough to mount it to a heavy duty aluminum suspension fork. I tore the dropouts right off and ate the pavement face first. "Heavy duty" aluminum in reality is about the same as marginally strong steel, so I should have known better.

Those are my results, your mileage and slippage may vary.

Brad


So perhaps you can tell me what motor you have fitted? (I am limited to 250 watts)
If I recall your weight is about half of mine? (alternatively, and perhaps better - can you please tell me what is the combined weight of bike, motor, battery and rider?)
And hills - can you please tell me what do you consider "steep" - 10% or 20% (have you tried 25% ?), because this is what I am faced with :rolleyes4:

and ps

It's not the torque I am concerned about, but front axle loading - it is fairly common for FWD to have issues starting uphill.
If you have all the weight on back wheels and very little on the front, then however much torque you have from the motor in the front wheel, you will not be going anywhere.

Pat Eaton
06-30-2013, 01:47 PM
I have posted a couple of pictures in the gallery under Velo's. the second shot shows the battery mounting. I made three packs, and mounted two together between my legs (hope never to have a fire) and one above the cranks in an aluminum bracket. The two between my legs are wedged in to some large angle steel welded to the frame.
Pat

TexasTuff
06-30-2013, 01:54 PM
I have posted a couple of pictures in the gallery under Velo's. the second shot shows the battery mounting. I made three packs, and mounted two together between my legs (hope never to have a fire) and one above the cranks in an aluminum bracket. The two between my legs are wedged in to some large angle steel welded to the frame.
Pat

Thanks Pat.

TexasTuff
07-01-2013, 12:41 PM
I ran across this elsewhere today and thought I would pass it along.
One of the reasons I am building my electric assist trike is for running errands. I live in the country and just about everything in Canton, Tx is 12 miles away, more or less. I wanted to stay on the conservative side and calculated that 15 ah at 24 volts would get me there and back. I've ordered 20 ah batteries so I can carry some extra weight at times.
This nifty electric bike range calculator confirmed that I would be using 60% of my capacity. It is tied in with Google Maps and uses their elevation information to calculate your range along with bike weight, your weight and type of bike you are riding. Also takes into account the percentage of assist you will provide as the rider.
If you have an interest in electric bikes or plan to use one to commute to work, you might use this handy tool to calculate what size battery you will need.
http://www.electricbikerange.info/Electric_bike_range.html

I can also see using it to calculate watts needed to take trips not familiar with you.
Well as you might be able to tell, I was quite impressed with this tool.

Kudos to the author and his partners.

SirJoey
07-01-2013, 02:50 PM
With 3 people on the bike (2 legitimate riders and one on the rear cargo box), I estimate a total weight of about 500 pounds total.
A tandem LR, with 3 people, & only 500 lbs? U were doing good!
My SINGLE LR, with just ME on it, was tipping the scales at over 425 lbs!!! :eek:
Of course, that's cuz I went overboard on the batts, though....

Motor & batts: 175 lbs.
Trike: 75 lbs. (conservatively)
Me: 180 lbs.

Total: 430 lbs, not counting any cargo. :laugh3:

If it was still motorized, it would be even MORE now, after upgrading the rear wheels to those donuts! :eek:



**** The Truth Is Out There! ****
http://img384.imageshack.us/img384/7131/sirjoeysigmedij1.gif
(Geezer & Bent Enthusiast At Large)

TexasTuff
07-03-2013, 09:48 PM
Any ideas y'all. Yesterday I rode the trike around on my drive on 12 volts. Not much power but not much expected. Today one of my batteries came in and I was getting ready to switch it over to 24 volts. I flipped the switch while still on 12 volts and it ran in reverse. All wiring is still the same as yesterday, no changes. I can switch positive and negative and it will run forward.
This is where my knowledge of hub motors just ran out. Can I run it with the leads reversed or should I reverse the wheel in the fork?
I have the wheel installed with the leads coming out the left side as sitting in the drivers seat per the instruction sheet that was in the box with the hubmotor.

Pat Eaton
07-03-2013, 10:54 PM
My experience is you can reverse the polarity to reverse the rotation, this is on a direct drive hub.

TexasTuff
07-03-2013, 11:04 PM
My experience is you can reverse the polarity to reverse the rotation, this is on a direct drive hub.

Thanks Pat. I posted this on Endless-Sphere also. I was not given the reason but had enough reason to re-read the instruction sheet. I had read that sheet numerous times and installed the wheel at the understanding I had at the time. After reading the instruction tonight I at once understood that I had installed the wheel backwards. All I need to do is reverse the wheel in the fork. I guess I just had a Duh moment.

I was also told if I just reversed the leads there would be much more drag when coasting. I did notice a lot of drag. Tomorrow will be a different day... I just mis-understood the Chinese interpretation of the instructions.

Ticktock
07-04-2013, 08:58 AM
If you even realise you misunderstood some of the translations I have seen here you are doing well!
I have seen complete paragraphs in "English" that I have no idea what they really mean! I have also seen sentences in Chinese that I can read, and have no idea what they mean .
Problem is that they think they speak English, then look up a dictionary for the big words, get the wrong word, and destroy the sentence. They would never think to ask a real English speaker to check what they write, or even write it for them. If I wanted to sell abike and needed a sign in Chinese, I would not write --I would get it written properly, so at least I did not look stupid----they will never learn!
Steve G,
Beijing

Radical Brad
07-04-2013, 11:29 AM
Before running the hubmotor in "reverse", I would get the ok form the manufacturer.
Sometimes, gears have a "direction" of wear, so running in reverse may cause excessive wear.
Another issue is commuter timing, which may be set for optimal efficienct in only one direction.

Wheelchair gearhead motors are a prime example. They do have reverse in the controller, but the motors are set for optimal performance in the "forward" direction.

Brad

TexasTuff
07-04-2013, 12:55 PM
Thanks Brad
This is not a geared motor, it is direct drive. After turning the wheel around in the fork everything is performing as expected. Only one of my batteries came in yesterday and I pared it with a car battery this am and it makes climbing hills easier. I would still like a little more climbing power. At present I'm not running with a controller. Just an on/off switch inline with 24 volts. The only markings of any kind was on the controller that is not working. The only english on the controller says 24v. Does anyone think/know that the motor might take 36 v? The motor has never been used but it is an old brushed motor. Aotema is the brand but with no other markings.

We always want a little more power, don't we.

Fauchet
07-05-2013, 06:13 PM
If you do increase the voltage, you might want to break it in gently first. In DC motors the brushes wear in to fit the commutator. Brushes start square and wear in with use, which increases the contact area and lowers the resistance a lot. Also if you can take it apart and find a safe place to drill large ventilation holes through the side covers, it will be much cooler, and more likely to survive higher power.

I've always wanted to take apart a cheap IR thermometer gun and aim the sensor at the motor, and remotely mount the display where I can see it. With car motors I was going to drill a hole in the shell and aim at the commutator - can't do this with a bike hub motor.

TexasTuff
07-05-2013, 06:50 PM
I have since found out a little more about this motor. It was sold in two different versions, 24v and 36v with the only difference being the controller. I think it is 450 watts at 36 volts. All I have to do is order a new controller for it.
Thanks for your info Fauchet.

darnthedog
07-05-2013, 09:12 PM
Texastuff
Try not to run too long on direct battery current without a controller. Some of these controllers run the motors with a pulsed dc to reduce the current being pulled by the motor. It's done that way to reduce heating up the motor during long run times. Not sure what brand motor you have but some of these direct drives have been run up to 72vdc. Just have to have the right controller and ensure it limits the amperage to the motors specs. Anyway have fun with that motor. Are you going to adapter Brad's velo shell to your trike? Or try and design your own?

TexasTuff
07-05-2013, 09:51 PM
Texastuff
Try not to run too long on direct battery current without a controller. Some of these controllers run the motors with a pulsed dc to reduce the current being pulled by the motor. It's done that way to reduce heating up the motor during long run times. Not sure what brand motor you have but some of these direct drives have been run up to 72vdc. Just have to have the right controller and ensure it limits the amperage to the motors specs. Anyway have fun with that motor. Are you going to adapter Brad's velo shell to your trike? Or try and design your own?

Hi darnthedog,
The motor brand is a Aotema brushed motor. Good only for 3,000 to 5,000 miles before brush replacement. I will have moved on to something else before then. My second battery was delivered today. Since finding it will handle 36v I'll order another battery tonight giving me 36v @ 20ah. Next week I'll start building the battery cabnet to hold 4 batteries in case I ever want to step up to 48 v. I'll also order a controller when I decide wich one I need to buy. Can I run 36v on a 48v controller? Don't know yet.
The velomobile shell will still be Skin on Frame. I have all the materials on hand except the Dacron. I've built one frame that I like the nose but not happy with the rest of it. Its difficult to get in and out. i think I'll use the nose and rebuild the rest of the body and change to underseat steering so I can lower the profile. I'm waiting to order the Dacron when I know how much I need.
Electric assist is being necessitated by developing physical conditions (old age). This will extend my riding life and may extend my life. Then again, may not.

PS: I'm still a noob at this but I think the controller you are talking about are for the 3 phase brushless motors. I've read of quite a few people using on/off switches on brushed motors. I'm also putting in a kill switch incase the contacts weld themselves together.

TexasTuff
07-06-2013, 05:36 PM
Short 5 mile test ride today at 24 volts. My second new battery came in yesterday so I had both new 12 v 20 ah batteries hooked up. I didn't want to get to far away from the house in case things didn't work so well. Everything functioned well but I will be moving up to 36 v. Speed on the flat today about 16 mph with no assistance. I'll go up 5 miles each ride until I can tell how much distance i can get. One thing I can tell is hill climbing. Hills that I normally struggled with at 4 to 5 mph was easy pedaling at 8 to 10 mph and I never drop down to my granny gears now. I've not detected anything overheating.

I left the house with 26.6 volts and returned with 25.5 volts. If that stays somewhat linear I would get about 20 miles before needing to recharge at 21 volts. I hope one more battery will increase that to 25 or 30 miles. I think a controller would improve distance also because I don't need to run wide open ALL the time. I don't want to buy another controller until I know how many volts I'll be running. A new set of tires in the back might help also. Get rid of the knobbies.

Overall I was happy with performance on a somewhat heavy trike.

TexasTuff
07-08-2013, 04:57 PM
Here are a few pictures of the Deltawolf with the present hub motor. I have run enough test to know that I love the assist that I'm getting from this low power hub motor and I'll be updating motor and batteries in the future.
This is the DeltaWolf as it stands today. I have the batteries in the basket in the back until a build a proper rack for them. Still don't know if that will be 36 volts or 48 volts.
http://texasrecumbents.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/electric-trike.jpg?w=627&h=470

Here is a close up of the hub motor

http://texasrecumbents.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/hub-motor.jpg?w=627&h=470

This is not my original idea. If I could remember where I saw it I would give him credit.
The motor came with a torque washer. A washer with a tab that sticks out into the dropouts. With the axle seated in the dropouts the little tab was below the opening. So I went to the scrap tool box and got a 10mm wrench to use as a torque arm. I'll pickup a suitable clamp to replace the cable tie on my next trip to town.

http://texasrecumbents.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/torque-arm-1.jpg?w=627&h=470

http://texasrecumbents.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/torque-arm-2.jpg?w=627&h=836

TexasTuff
07-11-2013, 04:55 PM
Between Doctor visits and cardiac rehab, I finally had time to do another test run on the DeltaWolf this morning. I did a 20 mile round trip. On the way out I used the hub motor only on the uphills and assisted all I could. I mostly had the motor on all the way back and couldn't pedal fast enough to keep up at times. On my way back there is a steady 3 mile climb that the little hub motor took in stride. When I pulled into the driveway i stopped to check wires, switches and hub motor for heat. In spite of the 95 degree ambient temperature I felt no excessive heat.
I'm feeling more and more confident that a low tech hub motor can fill the needs I now have. I want something that will give me 50% assist on the uphills and my part of the uphill assist and the flats still give me more than enough workout. My goal is really for 30 mile round trips. More than enough to get me to town and back and run my errands. My next trip will be to town and back.
Here is what I have in this very low tech approach. Craigslist find/trade for the motor. All the parts were new, but only the motor worked. i really don't have anything in the motor but we'll call it $100.00. New $1.39 for an on/off switch. $7.00 for wire and $85.00 for two 12 volt 20 amp hour AGM batteries. I didn't shop much, I might have found a better deal on teh batteries. I think I'll add another 12 volts to the system. That will give a little more speed (20 mph) and distance. Its working so well I may just stay with the low tech approach. The battery I wanted to order is $800.00. ouch.

Radical Brad
07-11-2013, 08:25 PM
It feels great to have those electrons pulling you along!
Congrats on a fine conversion, and an interesting take on the torque arm indeed.

Brad

Ticktock
07-11-2013, 09:35 PM
Hi, Texas
Be very care full here! The torque from the motor twists the axle clockwise as in your close up pic, and forces the 8mm end of the spanner against the fork, which is why a cable tie will hold it there. But this same torque reacts on the 10mm end of the spanner, on the axle, forcing it to go the other way--out of the drop out!!
If you get any loosening at all on that axle it will eject forward very quickly. You need some form of safety to hold it back even with a loose nut! And they do come loose --I've seen a few here with chewed out dropouts and twisted cables!
Steve G

dmac257
07-12-2013, 07:04 PM
Between Doctor visits and cardiac rehab, I finally had time to do another test run on the DeltaWolf this morning. I did a 20 mile round trip. On the way out I used the hub motor only on the uphills and assisted all I could. I mostly had the motor on all the way back and couldn't pedal fast enough to keep up at times. On my way back there is a steady 3 mile climb that the little hub motor took in stride. When I pulled into the driveway i stopped to check wires, switches and hub motor for heat. In spite of the 95 degree ambient temperature I felt no excessive heat.
I'm feeling more and more confident that a low tech hub motor can fill the needs I now have. I want something that will give me 50% assist on the uphills and my part of the uphill assist and the flats still give me more than enough workout. My goal is really for 30 mile round trips. More than enough to get me to town and back and run my errands. My next trip will be to town and back.
Here is what I have in this very low tech approach. Craigslist find/trade for the motor. All the parts were new, but only the motor worked. i really don't have anything in the motor but we'll call it $100.00. New $1.39 for an on/off switch. $7.00 for wire and $85.00 for two 12 volt 20 amp hour AGM batteries. I didn't shop much, I might have found a better deal on the batteries. I think I'll add another 12 volts to the system. That will give a little more speed (20 mph) and distance. Its working so well I may just stay with the low tech approach. The battery I wanted to order is $800.00. ouch.

I want to caution you about that motor. I can't tell from the pictures anything about the RATED voltage for the motor. It sounds like you are not using any kind of electronic speed control on that motor so you COULD burn up the motor if it is not rated for what you are feeding it. MOST speed control use Pulse Width Modulation to switch on and off full pack voltage to SIMULATE a lower voltage to make motor turn slower. If you are just turning on FULL voltage you need to make sure the motor can handle it. ALMOST all hub motors can handle 24v or 36v but make sure YOURS can handle it before you add another AGM to boost the voltage. SOME can only do 24v and if you put 36v on them they will burn up. You MIGHT be able to get away with PWM switching 36v on a 24v rated motor but that would only last a short while. Best to check first.

dmac257

TexasTuff
08-10-2013, 06:57 PM
This past week I went to Dallas to visit my son and daughter. While there my son helped me with the addition of underseat steering to the DeltaWolf. The heat was 100+ both days and really slowed us down. It took me an extra day to recover after returning home.
Changing to underseat steering will improve ingress and egress and lower the profile of the body by 3 or 4 inches. I can now resume construction of the SOF body.
The hub motor I have is rated at 48 volts but subject to overheat on long pulls. At 36 volts I have had no problems. I can now manage the big hills in my area with ease. I'll rephrase that. I pedal as hard as ever but going up the hills takes about half the time. Hills I used to climb at 3/4 mph I now ride at 7/8 mph. The only time I use the assist motor is climbing hills.

Fauchet
08-12-2013, 11:57 AM
Congrats on making progress!
Sure beating me, seems I'm taking the summer off, and I don't have 100F to blame. Your motor looks very similar to mine (also rated 36V). I plan to take it apart and drill big holes in it as Justin recommends for drainage. But really I want cooling, & run on 48V. The taking apart is the painful part. If I knew exactly where to drill I would do it without taking apart, with a vacuum right on the drill.
When we used to ship electric cars to Texas and Arizona, overheating motors happened every summer :(

Any pics so far on the body?

TexasTuff
08-12-2013, 02:56 PM
Congrats on making progress!
Sure beating me, seems I'm taking the summer off, and I don't have 100F to blame. Your motor looks very similar to mine (also rated 36V). I plan to take it apart and drill big holes in it as Justin recommends for drainage. But really I want cooling, & run on 48V. The taking apart is the painful part. If I knew exactly where to drill I would do it without taking apart, with a vacuum right on the drill.
When we used to ship electric cars to Texas and Arizona, overheating motors happened every summer :(

Any pics so far on the body?

Hi Fauchet,
I've read about drilling holes for cooling and also filling motor with oil. When I reach that point i'll look into it more. The motor I have now is not the final motor I'll have when finished. This motor is brushed and I want a brushless motor for less maintenance. I want a 750 watts with LeFePo batteries but I'll wait until I have the VM road worthy.
I'm still putting things back together before modifying the SOF frame. I ran into visibility problems but the USS will solve that. I liked the nose that I designed but will pretty well scrap the rest of it and rebuild. Hope to have it all finished within a month. I'll order fabric as soon as I know how much I'll need.
We're supposed to get a brake in this 100+ temps the end of this week and I can extend my days out some.

graucho
08-12-2013, 04:19 PM
I like your torque arm. It amazing how much torque these motors put out. I too, am devising a plan for a safety torque arm. Sounds like your loving your assist. Personally i'm getting a little lazy and putting my thumb on the throttle a bit to much. I probably could get an additional 10 miles out of a charge if I worked the old legs a bit more. You have one sweet bike there. Great modifications and conversion. Hopefully the heat gives you a break soon. Too much time outside in the heat sucks the life out of you.

TexasTuff
08-19-2013, 09:48 PM
graucho, I made a rule for myself, if the motor is on I'm pedaling. I've pretty well stuck to it. I do find myself running the motor more now on the flats and pedaling in my big chainring. The motor has doubled my climbing speed but I work as hard as I did before putting the motor on the trike.
I cut a blank for the torque arm but have not yet devised a way to cut the shape for the hole in the end. All in due time.

I have been going to cardiac rehab 3 days a week for 2 1/2 months and riding the trike on my off days. Amazing what a workout everyday will do for your endurance.

I'm sorry to say I've not made any progress on the VM body for awhile. i keep changing my mind about how i want it but I guess it will evolve sooner or later.