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Tradetek
12-16-2012, 01:39 AM
For the TIG guys and gals in the crowd, "Mr Tig" over at weld.com just posted this video on using "Silicon Bronze" filler material to do Silicon Bronze Brazing (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F2_hXQ4ABrg) using the TIG process and equipment.

I personally was really glad to see this because it will definitely help with attaching cable guides so that all my cables will be clean when I finally get around to starting my builds.

darnthedog
12-16-2012, 12:28 PM
Thanks for the tip. As I am exploring and debating which tig welder to get this sort of link really helps me understand the Tig process better all the time. Which pratice is much different then viewing it should help easy me into the Tig process in the near future. I see the big 250 Amp units and then see very little amperage is ever used. Thus the debate to save for the large units or got for the the Everlast Tig unit. I might even explore building with Titanium eventually, but again there is no need for heavy amperage. Anyway thanks for the pointers.

FlatBlack
12-16-2012, 01:24 PM
Thanks for posting that link, definitely something I will try. What I found interesting was with the technique he used, the final result while not a weld, apart from color, sure did look like one and a real nice one at that.

Cheers,
Bill

sandman
12-16-2012, 04:47 PM
For the TIG guys and gals in the crowd, "Mr Tig" over at weld.com just posted this video on using "Silicon Bronze" filler material to do Silicon Bronze Brazing (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F2_hXQ4ABrg) using the TIG process and equipment.

I personally was really glad to see this because it will definitely help with attaching cable guides so that all my cables will be clean when I finally get around to starting my builds.

I used this method on an autogyro a few years back and its a good joint but for cable guides I prefer silver solder, slightly lower temp than brazing, can be done with butane torch and very neat flow and strong enough, where the bronze does score is you dont need to post heat treat high carbon steel after the brazing unlike welding although thats splitting hairs in thiscase
John

Tradetek
12-16-2012, 11:50 PM
Sandman: Just a note on the post-heat comment... with TIG the everything that I have researched (including discussions with a TIG instructor who trains working professional welders for their advanced certifications) it isn't necessary to post heat/treat for any steel thinner than .120 including 4130.

DTD: Given the price differences and the fact that thin wall 4130 is not much heavier than comparable aluminum for the same frame, I couldn't justify the higher cost of a unit capable of doing Aluminum. As for amperage, the rule of thumb for TIG is 1 AMP per thousands thickness of material as a starting point until you hit .187, then the drop off of AMP/Thousands is much slimmer. I have been finding with my trials that I'm actually using about 15% less amperage than the thickness of my material, so although my TIG is capable of using 230v, I don't bother because at 120v using about 45-50 AMPs for .065 I have never tripped my 20 AMP circuit breaker and using 120 AMPs for .187 wall, I only tripped it occasionally if I was doing a particularly long run, meaning 36 inches!

Flatback: I watched all the TIG videos posted by "Mr Tig" aka "weld.com" and "weldingtipsandtricks.com" and was able to fire up and run good looking beads with 15 minutes of opening my welder new from the box. They both do really good instructional videos. The hardest part is sifting through them to find the ones for TIG with mild steel or 4130 depending on which route you go.

richl
12-17-2012, 12:47 AM
Thanks Trade
Cool process, did I hear that correct, they mention 40K psi strength? If so that is a very strong bead for a non structural process. Too busy to recheck if I heard that correct. Thanks for linking to this.

Rich

Tradetek
12-17-2012, 01:01 AM
Sounds about right, I just remember hearing the strength and telling myself that should be strong enough for brazeons.

Also, in a recent weldingtipsandtricks video he was talking about making a few tools and coating the target metal end using the same silicon bronze to help cut down any impact that the tool could have on the weld from a contamination and deformation standpoint.

One looked interesting as he tool a short flathead screwdriver and ground the tip off the driver and then coated the first half inch or so with the bronze and then he uses that as a way to force 2 pieces of metal together close to the weld point for tacks where it would be too hot to use his fingers and too awkward to use a clamp, but he needs the pieces pushed together in order to remove any separation between 2 surfaces being welded together.