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View Full Version : New tig welder DC/AC



carlosdaniel
10-07-2012, 01:05 PM
Hi all, I just bought a welder TIG DC / AC down to make it shortly MALAMBO trike (19.8 kg.) But aluminum, I have a long way to achieve this goal because first I have to learn to weld aluminum with tig. My question is this, anyone have a manual for this machine (China) as the manual that came with this machine is not corresponding to this machine, look on the internet but I have few references to it and there are many controls to adjust I'm afraid to start experimenting without having any notion of individual controls, although it is to serve, I could not put in the correct values ​​to start experimentar.
Thanks
Carlos Daniel
5417

darnthedog
10-07-2012, 01:20 PM
Looks much like the Everlast welders and the Locost welder from China. Welding Tips and trick take about setting up these welders. I doubt there is much difference to the setting as your going to deal with the same Amps- preflows and post flows. SO I'd say follow advice from welding tips and trick- Googling should find you a link. Hope that helps. Also find a local welding friend is always helpful. I am considering going to Tig myself and have been watching all the tips they have.

Tradetek
10-07-2012, 02:42 PM
Take a look at this YouTube video for an AXT-IT9250 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TWPrtADRRRQ) TIG welder which looks exactly the same as yours. I have a feeling it may be the same welder sold under a different brand name, but with the same model number.

The video goes over initial setup.

Tradetek
10-07-2012, 03:00 PM
By the way, be very careful when buying an auto-darkening helmet for TIG welding.

You need one that has a response time of 1/25,000 sec response time to protect your eyes from the arc initiation.

Anything slower than that is designed for MIG and ARC welding. And unfortunately a lot of helmet specs don't supply this info in their on-line specs which makes it a pain to find. I assume that you are in Central America and don't have a local Harbor Freight, but here is a link to the Chicago Electric (http://www.harborfreight.com/blue-flame-design-auto-darkening-welding-helmet-91214.html) helmet I use with my TIG welder. I really like it. Some things it has that are good to look for are a sweat band, sensitivity adjustment, as well as a shade control (this one is really common).

carlosdaniel
10-07-2012, 04:29 PM
Thanks for the info on the mask, I have a steelpro Optech and live in South America, more precisely in Argentina and even more in the city of Corrientes

http://www.welcomeargentina.com/corrientes/fotografias.html (http://www.welcomeargentina.com/corrientes/fotografias.html)

http://www.lubeseguridad.com.ar/detalle.php3?titulo=Careta%20Soldador%20Fotosensib le%20SteelPro%20Optech&subrubro=4&rubro=2&expand=SI&articulo=387&perfil=&marca=

Tradetek
10-07-2012, 08:47 PM
That helmet looks like it should be good as long as the rating is correct. .000033 is 1/30,000 of a sec versus the minimum 1/25,000 required for TIG so yours will protect your eyes better.

Note that there is also a sensitivity setting... I have light sensitive eyes so I started with the most sensitive setting and darkest lens setting and am working my way backwards for my highest normal amperage until I find the settings I like the best, so far I'm still on 11 on darkness and thinking about go to 10 using about 100-110 AMPs. Which means I'm pretty confident that I'll drop down to a 10 and possibly a 9 darkness when I start working with thin walled mild steel and even thinner walled chrome-moly tubing that will have me running 35-60 AMPs on average.

Note if it is solar, and you are only using it as a hobby helmet, advice I found is to put it out in the sun to charge the batteries every now and again if you have not used it in a while.

Also, most of the welder's here are ARC/Stick and MIG welders so you might want to join weldingweb.com (http://weldingweb.com/)'s forum also. They have a lot of professional TIG welders who are happy to give lots of technical advice, so be honest if they are over your head or you are having problems with a language barrier.