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View Full Version : Mig welder in basement..Exhaust fan set up ideas?



Evox_Rider
04-07-2012, 08:07 PM
Just purchased a mig/flux core that runs on 110v. There is not really any level areas in the tiny back yard, not to mention would have to construct elaborate shields so other neighbors wouldn't be blinded. So was considering setting up something in the basement. Has anyone else done such a thing and if so, what type of exhaust air setup did you use? There is a 12x 24 window with horizontal sliding panes...I was thinking of trying to find a furnace blower and motor and figure out a way to hook up some dryer venting to the intake side. The exhaust side would maybe take some sheetmetal fittings to attach it to a piece of plywood that would fit into the open side of the window...any ideas appreciated.

worker1234
04-07-2012, 08:51 PM
A furnace blower is way to big. I want an exhaust system in my garage. How about a large exhaust fan for bathroom? You do need one more than I do. If you can make a good cheap one I would like to copy it.

maddox
04-08-2012, 03:35 PM
Why not use 2 cheap ventilators like these (http://www.krefel.be/medias/sys_master/Content-IMG/8813920550942/FT-30B%20black.jpg?mime=image/jpeg&realname=FT-30B black.jpg)?

Evox_Rider
04-08-2012, 06:03 PM
I was thinking of a more directed outside type of thing...where the fumes and smoke would be vacuumed away more or less.

Old Peddler
04-08-2012, 06:40 PM
I think you are making a bigger issue than it really is. For the limited amount of welding that you are going to be doing I don't think that ventilation is that much of a issue. Just set up a fan for those times that you weld. Welding is not a real smokey venture. If I were you I wouldn't make a mountain out of a molehill. It's really not that big of a issue. Open the window and fire it up!

maddox
04-09-2012, 08:55 AM
TIG welding steel is fairly smokeless. But rod-arc welding or flux core MIG, smoke garantied. LOTS of it.

Trike Lover
04-09-2012, 01:13 PM
Just purchased a mig/flux core that runs on 110v. There is not really any level areas in the tiny back yard, not to mention would have to construct elaborate shields so other neighbors wouldn't be blinded. So was considering setting up something in the basement. Has anyone else done such a thing and if so, what type of exhaust air setup did you use? There is a 12x 24 window with horizontal sliding panes...I was thinking of trying to find a furnace blower and motor and figure out a way to hook up some dryer venting to the intake side. The exhaust side would maybe take some sheetmetal fittings to attach it to a piece of plywood that would fit into the open side of the window...any ideas appreciated.


I rigged an exhaust fan in a window when I was doing a large number of woodworking projects some years back.

It started with a piece of 1/4" plywood that fitted (with a little trimming) into the opened window frame. I happened to have a pedestal-base fan, 12-13" in diameter, that had been relegated to the basement because the side-to-side oscillation had quit working. I removed the pedestal, and mounted the fan to a 13" hole jigsawed in the plywood. The metal cage on the fan made mounting easy - I just took off the front half of the cage (every one of these i've seen has a 2-piece cage) and used a few screws and wire clamps to fasten the cage, motor and fan blade to the plywood.

I was fortunate in that the fan's speed control was on the back end of the fan motor, but you have one with speed control buttons in the base, just disassemble the base and isolate the wires for the "High" speed setting and connect them directly to the AC plug. I didn't bother to put the front half of the fan blade cage on the other (outside) side of the plywood/fan assembly, but it probably would be a good idea if there are children or pets around.

When I wanted to generate sawdust, I just opened the window and put the plywood/fan into the opening. I held it in place with a couple of "barrel bolts" - the kind used for cabinets or small gates, cost a couple of dollars at the hardware store.

I discovered by experimentation that having the fan mounted in a piece of plywood that filled the open window frame space made it much more effective at dust removal than just hanging the fan in the window. With no "shield" around the fan, it just spun and stirred up the air in the window, which of course was mostly outside air.

I was dubious about how effective this lash-up was, until I happened to go outside to take a break after doing a whole series of mitre cuts on the chop saw, which sat under the window. From the outside, I could see sawdust-laden air pouring out. Total cost was 1 junked fan, 1 piece scrap plywood, and some bits of hardware.

One thing I did learn was that I needed to open a window somewhere else in the house before starting the exhaust fan. If I did not, the exhaust fan would draw air into the house through the chimney of the gas furnace and the outlet of the gas dryer - not a good thing, as the furnace exhaust gasses contain a large amount of carbon monoxide.

Hope this helps.
TL

Old Peddler
04-10-2012, 01:45 AM
Here ya go: http://www.sentryair.com/portablefumeextractor.htm



Portable Fume Extractors

Sentry Air Systems portable fume extractors are available in several different sizes and air volume configurations. These units are equipped with heavy-duty casters, portability handles, and a variety of source-capture flex arms. Two flexible hose options [self-supportive or python style] are available and can be configured as single or multiple operator models.
Accompanied by high-quality filtration media, these systems are designed to work with a variety of applications where fume and particulate need to be captured and purified. Typical filtration combinations include HEPA and Activated Carbon filters or specialty-blended media [Acid Gas, Mercury, Aldehyde, Ammonia]. These compact units allow significant operator control through mobility and source-capture placement.

Evox_Rider
04-11-2012, 08:11 AM
Here ya go: http://www.sentryair.com/portablefumeextractor.htm



Portable Fume Extractors

Sentry Air Systems portable fume extractors are available in several different sizes and air volume configurations. These units are equipped with heavy-duty casters, portability handles, and a variety of source-capture flex arms. Two flexible hose options [self-supportive or python style] are available and can be configured as single or multiple operator models.
Accompanied by high-quality filtration media, these systems are designed to work with a variety of applications where fume and particulate need to be captured and purified. Typical filtration combinations include HEPA and Activated Carbon filters or specialty-blended media [Acid Gas, Mercury, Aldehyde, Ammonia]. These compact units allow significant operator control through mobility and source-capture placement.


Thanks for that, I was trying to figure out a method of mounting the blower on a shelf positioned under the window, but seeing those machines, I can just make a simple box with castors to contain the blower, with flexible hose for input and output.

valveman
07-23-2012, 12:52 PM
Well I don't recommend welding in a basement, but if you must, there are certain precautions you need to address:
1)Select an area where no flammables are near the welding area. The further away the better.
2)Dedicate a steel table for welding.
3)Get a shroud installed so sparks do not go beyond the welding area.
4)Ventilation is very important.

Harbor freight has a nice blower and hoses that will do just nicely to vent the basement while welding. You do not want to breathe this in. It is dangerous and toxic.
This is the blower I use in my workshop. I vent the fumes to the outside. It works great!
http://www.harborfreight.com/8-inch-portable-ventilator-97762.html

RunnerPack
07-24-2012, 12:02 AM
Fan or no, I don't recommend welding anything galvanized (like electrical conduit) to avoid the possibility of getting Zinc poisoning. Also, as valveman said, be very careful of the sparks. Think about getting something like this (http://www.harborfreight.com/6-ft-x-8-ft-fiberglass-welding-blanket-95015.html) and make a kind of welding booth.

Be safe and post pics of the cool stuff you weld!

Ibedayank
07-24-2012, 12:37 AM
4751

Furnace duct fan and ducting set it up so it blows outside not on what your welding

need a hose dryer vent hose

all parts available from lowes homedepot menards or similar and much CHEAPER then a factory fume extractor thats just a fan and a filter does not vent outside.

darnthedog
07-24-2012, 11:08 AM
Fan or no, I don't recommend welding anything galvanized (like electrical conduit) to avoid the possibility of getting Zinc poisoning. Also, as valveman said, be very careful of the sparks. Think about getting something like this (http://www.harborfreight.com/6-ft-x-8-ft-fiberglass-welding-blanket-95015.html) and make a kind of welding booth.

Be safe and post pics of the cool stuff you weld!

Please read the following about welding Galvanized Steel products: http://www.nakedwhiz.com/weldinggalvanized.pdf
Also here is another report made by the Government: http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/toxprofiles/tp60-c2.pdf

Welding Galvanized steel is NOT as hazardous as urban myth would have you believe. There are effects however overall Zinc Oxide is consumed daily in Meat and sea food and ingested through water and water based drinks. If you use a simple particle respirator-face mask- you should be fine n short term use. You can clean off Galvanizing will a simple acid dip- A dilute pool acid if I remember correctly. A wire brush tend to clear it as well, if you are really worried about it or have a reaction to the Zinc Oxide created when welding.

Tomaso
07-24-2012, 04:14 PM
Hi Evox, I heard one guy took the cooling fan from a car, complete with the cape it sits in, and mounted it straight to his window frame. I believe he used it for painting in the garage, but with a hose attached to a funnel close to the workpiece it should work good.
kind of like this one: 4757
:) T

maddox
07-25-2012, 12:46 AM
As professional welder , I can attest that there are welding issues that ain't urban myth.
Zinc Flu won't kill you but be ready for 2 days of muscle and headache, fatigue and other flu-like symptoms. On the other hand, to "get it", you need to burn off a lot of zinc.

Arc eye is another matter.

Tigerman1962
07-25-2012, 11:43 AM
Have you thought about getting one of those exhaust fan hoods for over the stove? You could run the vent pipe through a basement window, and most of them even have filters on them. Tigerman

Evox_Rider
07-25-2012, 12:09 PM
Lots of great ideas and suggestions, guys! Turns out we have since moved into a house with a garage...so all is good now! Just have to find time to do any welding...lol. So many things need doing when you first move in...