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theludicrous
03-09-2011, 10:57 PM
hello people, i have gone through most of the forum and couldn't find out what correct procedure i need to do for stick/arc welding.

do i strike the arc first, then put down the darkening face shield or vice versa?

please advice.

Odd Man Out
03-10-2011, 01:09 AM
Face mask down first -- ALWAYS
Believe me when I tell you that you don't EVER want to do it any other way
Another tip
NEVER look at the bright light without protection = welding 101

John Lewis
03-10-2011, 06:16 AM
Best trick is to get an auto darkening helmet. They are the best thing since sliced bread.
My welding improved 100% almost as soon as I got one.

Flicking the visor down and striking the arc in the dark is no more.
John

maddox
03-10-2011, 09:18 AM
If you want "arc eye (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arc_eye)", you're doing it right.

First the mask, then strike the arc.
Practice helps coordinating the striking of the arc on the right spot. Or, having a very bright lamp illuminating the workpiece, that will give you a barely visible workpiece, viewed trough the vizor.

I agree totaly with John Lewis. An automatic welders helmet helps a lot. Preferably one with an adjustable darknes.
For low amp applications an "11" is to dark to see the meltbath, and for high amp applications it's to light.

Trike Lover
03-10-2011, 03:32 PM
Best trick is to get an auto darkening helmet. They are the best thing since sliced bread.
My welding improved 100% almost as soon as I got one.

Flicking the visor down and striking the arc in the dark is no more.
John

John is dead right - the auto-darkening helmet is the saviour of garage hackers. My welding got better very quickly too...:jester:
If you don't have one, save up & get one.

In the meantime, mask/visor down first always, then strike the arc. Other way round = pain if you're lucky and blindness if you're not. Also, make sure your mask has at least a shade 12 glass for arc work. The goggles used for gas welding are nowhere near dark enough.

Cheezy Rider
03-10-2011, 04:27 PM
AND make sure that anyone near you is facing away from the arc when you are welding. I worked around welding all my life, and when I worked with a Tig welder, I would go home and have sunburn-like skin anywhere I didn't have protection. Imagine what that would do to your eyes. YOU ONLY HAVE ONE PAIR----PROTECT THEM!!!

Jose_Franco
03-10-2011, 05:09 PM
Harbor Freight has cheap autodarkening helmets. They are worth every penny!!! Trust us on that one :D You don't have to hold the mask, you don't accidentally strike an arc and get blinded. It took me a while to decide to buy one, but if I would have known before, I would have gotten one the same day I bought the welder!

Trike Lover
03-10-2011, 08:32 PM
And while we're all on the subject of safety, what do you wear as a well-dressed welder?

Preferably a long, heavy leather apron, or at least one with no pockets, leather gloves/gauntlets, long-sleeve shirt with collar done up to the neck, welder's beanie hat under your visor harness, leather boots not plastic runners, and generally nothing that will catch and hold a glob of molten metal or a spark as it flies off of your weld. Setting yourself on fire is something we all joke about; in practice it's painful even to get a spark through your clothing.

Also another reason it's always "mask down first" - Protect Your Eyes!".

calcustom
03-10-2011, 09:15 PM
Harbor Freight has cheap autodarkening helmets. They are worth every penny!!! Trust us on that one :D You don't have to hold the mask, you don't accidentally strike an arc and get blinded. It took me a while to decide to buy one, but if I would have known before, I would have gotten one the same day I bought the welder!
I bought my autodarkening helmet from HF and am very happy with the performance.
It is letting this newb welder concentrate on welding and not worry about flashing my eyes.

savarin
03-10-2011, 10:43 PM
For the newbies.
Also dont weld where the arc can reflect of of white walls around your helmet. You can get arc eye from the reflected UV as well.
Arc eye feels like your eye/eyes are filled with sharp sand, very painful.
A simple remedy is cold wet used tea bags on your eyes and just lay back and rest.
Be wary of lace holes in shoes as the slag drops off with a guidance system and will find them.

maddox
03-10-2011, 10:54 PM
If you find cold wet teabags a tad gross, slices of potato or cucumber will do as well.

And I can show you the marks of a molten glob of steel meeting skin. (remember that bit of pork that slipped trough the grill of the BBQ, yep, that smell)

savarin
03-10-2011, 11:18 PM
And I can show you the marks of a molten glob of steel meeting skin. (remember that bit of pork that slipped trough the grill of the BBQ, yep, that smell)
Ha Ha, got a few of them as well. Oh how I recognise that aroma.
My worst was when welding a pipe in a trench. A huge glob of slag fell into the gaping top of my boot. I was trapped under the pipe and couldnt get my foot up to shake it out.:furious: It burnt a really deep crater just behind the ankle bone.:rolleyes4:

imamedik
03-10-2011, 11:39 PM
FYI, HF has auto darkening helmets on sale http://www.harborfreight.com/retail-flyer?utm_source=retail&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=1011b just browse the flyers.

theludicrous
03-11-2011, 01:02 AM
thanks people for the advice.

the place i'm from doesn't really have a culture for bike hacking and there isn't harbor freight here, so i need to look around, or maybe even ship it in.

for a start i'm thinking of building a jig or a platform in the corner of the room for me to mess around with a stick welder. (mum doesn't like messy places. :))

Odd Man Out
03-11-2011, 02:58 AM
for a start i'm thinking of building a jig or a platform in the corner of the room for me to mess around with a stick welder. (mum doesn't like messy places. :))

Please don't take this the wrong way but it seems like you may have little to no welding experience --- that is no big deal, we were all there once. May I suggest that you read read read all you can find about welding before you dive into it. From the above statement it seems like you are talking about trying to weld inside a house -- I hope that is not the case. Welding can produce some deadly fumes that can harm/kill you -- you need a well ventilated area to practise in. Also it is not uncommon for welding misshaps to create fire in unexpected places. Anyplace other than somewhere with a concrete floor is a no go to weld in. Just trying to look out for my fellow humanoid.

maddox
03-11-2011, 03:10 AM
I have/had my workshop in the living room (and yes, I'm married ). The lathe and mill have a good place, but we did draw the line at anglegrinding, painting, working with fiber/polyester and welding. In effect nothing that makes obnoxious fumes is allowed in the living room (farts excluded).

But yes, any floor except concrete , metal or stone is out of the question for safe welding or anglegrinding.

I solved the fume issue with a lean to, surrounded by welding screens. And that lean to is expanding and becoming the workshop.

theludicrous
03-11-2011, 06:48 AM
thanks **** *** and maddox, point noted.

will go figure it out.

willnewton
03-11-2011, 12:28 PM
http://www.millerwelds.com/resources/improving-your-skills/stick/

click on the "Guidelines for stick welding" pdf file

next you can search youtube stick (arc) welding tutorials

Lowe's, Home Depot, Tractor Supply have welding equipment if they are near you. I have the harbor Freight autohelmet- $49.99. IMHO it is not optional. Welder, helmet, gloves, electrodes are the minimum starter kit.