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Hpkid
03-09-2011, 06:17 PM
I am looking to purchase my first welder and I am considering this one:

Campbell Hausfeld WS0990 115-Volt Stick Welder

I am considering this model based on cost and voltage/amp input requirements.

Does anyone here have any experience with this welder?

Trike Lover
03-09-2011, 10:17 PM
I have seen this welder marketed under other brands and used one. It worked, sort of. One thing that's really important to note is that its duty cycle is only 10% at 70 amps. That meant, in practice, that you weld a little and wait a lot. At 70 amps, 1 welding minute and 10 cooling minutes.

The duty cycle at, say, 50 amps will probably be only about 15%. For every minute of welding, you'll need seven minutes of cooling off. They're a light-duty unit, good for the occasional repair. They don't stand up to heavy use or abuse. IMHO, they might be a bit light for Zombie work. Just my opinion, though. The rod sizes are OK, but about the minimum you can get away with. The duty cycle is going to be your limiting factor, though, so think hard about how you're going to be welding your frames. It's slow going waiting for the machine to cool off.

buzzboxdon
09-15-2011, 09:38 PM
I bought one of these Campbell Hausfeld 70 amp welders last week off of Craigslist for $45. I am an absolute newbie arc welder. It worked! I couldn't strike an arc with the 1/16" 7014 rod that was included in the deal. But I bought some 6013 3/32" Lincoln rod and there's hope! Some ugly beads but not all the machine's fault. Now it's practice, practice, practice. And maybe another welder but for the relatively inexpensive 5 lbs of rod-$15 at HD I can gain some technique and confidence that I will complete a Marauder 2.28462847

Trike Lover
09-15-2011, 09:58 PM
I bought one of these Campbell Hausfeld 70 amp welders last week off of Craigslist for $45. I am an absolute newbie arc welder. It worked! I couldn't strike an arc with the 1/16" 7014 rod that was included in the deal. But I bought some 6013 3/32" Lincoln rod and there's hope! Some ugly beads but not all the machine's fault. Now it's practice, practice, practice. And maybe another welder but for the relatively inexpensive 5 lbs of rod-$15 at HD I can gain some technique and confidence that I will complete a Marauder 2.2846[/ATTuACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]2847

One trick you can use to up the duty cycle a bit is to scrounge up a couple of 115VAC 4" - 4 1/2" square muffin fans and mount them to the vent louvers on the left hand side of the machine. Mount them to blow air in, not suck air out. This will improve the cooling of the internal components and give you a bit better duty cycle. I don't know where you are or what you've got locally by way of electronics surplus outlets, but usually these fans run $5 - $10, and they move quite a bit of air. Wire them up onto an AC lamp cord and plug that in to a second outlet. I expect e-bay will have them, as well as the various online electronics surplus outfits.

Eg.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/115V-Muffin-Style-Fan-Fans-Silent-Fan-5-blade-9093-/360390626412?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item53e8f48c6c

HTH

buzzboxdon
09-16-2011, 02:40 AM
Thanks TriKe Lover! We have a(Oregon State University) state surplus store here open every Wednesday, loads of cheap electronics. The PC I'm using was from there, I also got a rear suspension mountain donor bike for the Marauder build from there for $20 three weeks ago. The twin fans is a great idea. This town is bike heaven, miles of paved bike trails, kinetic sculpture enthusiasts, the home of the BikeE recumbent, a bike cooperative open every day. Rains a bit but not much snow, not too hot.
2852


One trick you can use to up the duty cycle a bit is to scrounge up a couple of 115VAC 4" - 4 1/2" square muffin fans and mount them to the vent louvers on the left hand side of the machine. Mount them to blow air in, not suck air out. This will improve the cooling of the internal components and give you a bit better duty cycle. I don't know where you are or what you've got locally by way of electronics surplus outlets, but usually these fans run $5 - $10, and they move quite a bit of air. Wire them up onto an AC lamp cord and plug that in to a second outlet. I expect e-bay will have them, as well as the various online electronics surplus outfits.

Eg.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/115V-Muffin-Style-Fan-Fans-Silent-Fan-5-blade-9093-/360390626412?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item53e8f48c6c

HTH

Ibedayank
09-16-2011, 04:11 AM
buzzboxdon

to learn about welding goto
WWW>WELDINGWEB.com many diffent sections to learn from its free you dont have to join to see the pictures either but read read read and learn
then practice and practice some more
welding rod sizes 1/16 5/64 3/32 that machine will not have the power to burn thicker rods
1/16 rods you can order from harborfreight 5/64 not so common but what i found was 50# boxes for little over $100 3/32 common rod available at lowes homedepot tractor supply and im sure many more

buzzboxdon
09-17-2011, 01:27 AM
Ibedayank

Thanks for mentioning weldingweb website! I highly recommend it also. For new welders like me and pros also.

Yesterday I used 1/16" stock for my first ever beads.
2859

Today I used 1/8" stock. Not pretty either. Hard time getting an arc started. But I changed the stick angle to a more vertical...15-20 degrees and had better success. That little 70 amp box can do the job if you are patient. Just need to "stay in the moment, Grasshopper" get close to the work so you can see the puddle. Don't forget to breathe. Work that puddle. Stop. Let the box cool down(no fans yet). And get another stick. Lay another bead. Surprisingly good penetration. Duty cycle was not a problem.
2860
If you look closely you can find a few respectable places. :-) I got a little to aggressive cleaning the welds with my grinder flap disc. Not willing to actually ride anything I welded together quite yet. Supposed to rain this weekend here. Back to having a life.

Ibedayank
09-17-2011, 01:41 AM
buzzbox
no worries my grinder makes me the welder i'm not...lmao

buzzboxdon
09-19-2011, 11:35 PM
Well this is already pathetic. Having to publicly display my third attempt at welding with the Campbell Hausfeld WS0990 115-Volt Stick Welder.
2876
I rest my case. I still think this welder can do the job. Yeah, I know the beads all go down hill and it's obvious I am having issues getting the arc started. But it's great entertainment for the college students next door. I come out with my little metal bench and 6 by 8 inch piece of metal, harbor freight auto darkening helmet, safety goggles, stocking cap, respirator, welding gloves, heavy jacket, pants and boots, and this simple little welder. zzzzzt stick, zzzzzt stick, zzzzzt stick, zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzt, finally. Chip, chip, chip, brusha, brusha, brusha. Grown man 67 years old. Then I haul out the donor bikes, fire up the grinder and sparks fly and China's best gets reduced to scrap. If the kids next door ask me what I think I am doing, I will say "This guy and his wife in Canada calling themselves Atomic Zombie make me do these things."

Ibedayank
09-20-2011, 12:21 AM
Nice job...
On thin stuff like bike frames yep the little welders do the job just fine.

You will know you have no hope and are a true zombie when you can look @ a $1000 bike and say... I can use those parts for a "" insert design here""

gizzmotick
09-20-2011, 08:12 AM
I've got essentially a newer model of that same welder... and it's all I've used to put together the Wildkat that I'm working on right now. Of course, it's also how I learned to weld... and I didn't do nearly as much practice as the OP here. It's worked great for me... Bike has already gone about 12 miles in test rides and held up great. I've even hit some world-class construction bumps at pretty decent speed and it's held up just fine.

I like the 1/16" #6016 rods from Farm & Fleet, but they can get a bit hot - even on the low power setting.

HPVTraveler
09-20-2011, 08:55 AM
buzzboxdon;

At least you are not turning into one of those flesh eating zombies ... LOL.

Also by thriving on China steel, You are reusing Americian Steel. In a much better build.

PeterT
09-20-2011, 09:44 AM
Hpkid,

the best way to get a stick welder working is to remember this:
arc/stick welder(righthander) strike arc by moving rod from left to right, and getting rod to 'matchbook', and then draw/pull rod away from weldment puddle
MIG welder(righthander) squeeze trigger and move wire from right to left, pushing weldment in front of puddle

PeterT

buzzboxdon
09-27-2011, 01:58 PM
gizzmotick

I've been haunting the Marauder forum with my further welding adventures. Brad echos your advice on using the smaller rod that you had success with. I checked Farm and Feed and correct me if I'm wrong but you mentioned 1/16" 6016. Farm and Feed offer 1/16" 6013. Thanks again for the encouragement. I am "sticking" with the Campbell Hausfeld box!


I've got essentially a newer model of that same welder... and it's all I've used to put together the Wildkat that I'm working on right now. Of course, it's also how I learned to weld... and I didn't do nearly as much practice as the OP here. It's worked great for me... Bike has already gone about 12 miles in test rides and held up great. I've even hit some world-class construction bumps at pretty decent speed and it's held up just fine.

I like the 1/16" #6016 rods from Farm & Fleet, but they can get a bit hot - even on the low power setting.