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presyesc
05-02-2008, 10:45 PM
Hello- I am in the market for a welder, I looked at a Clarke that was on a previous thread- and I also looked at a Clarke at "fingerhut.com" because I have a credit card with them. My question is- Why is the one from fingerhut more costly when it has less amps? Perhaps it is just a novice insight. Here are the links: How do these two compare?

http://www.fingerhut.com/ProductGroup.aspx?offergroupxid=62900&categoryxid=2247&cmCategoryID=search

http://www.eastwoodco.com/shopping/product/detailmain.jsp?itemID=1287&itemType=PRODUCT&iMainCat=607&iSubCat=613&iProductID=1287&itemType=PRODUCT

TheKid
05-03-2008, 12:42 AM
Only one answer comes to my mind. Fingerhut is an expensive site to shop from.

Wood Butcher
05-03-2008, 06:25 AM
My question is- Why is the one from fingerhut more costly when it has less amps?IMHO, they are charging more for less because they can.

For a better comparison, look here:

http://store.weldingdepot.com/cgi/weldingdepot/scan/fi=products/st=db/sp=results/co=1/sf=category/se=Mig%20Welders%20110%20Volt/op=eq/nu=0/bs=1/ml=15/tf=description/to=x/se=1/sf=inactive/op=ne/sf=tax_category/se=1/op=eq/va=banner_text=/va=banner_image=.html

A good question to ask yourself...is the cart really worth the extra money? Traditionally, a weldor's first project is to build a cart for the machine. It's a good way to learn and it's more fun than just running beads on pieces of steel for practice.

My personal preference would be to look at either Miller, Hobart or Lincoln if I were in the market for a MIG welder (call it welding machine snobbery if you like). The Clarke machine is built by a company in Italy by the name of Cebora, who rebadge the machines for several other companies. The Miller, Hobart and Lincoln machines are made in the US. If you ever need service or repairs on the machine, it's a lot easier to get it locally on one of the "Big Three" units.

Don't get me wrong, I'm not trashing the Clarke unit. Once you gain enough skill at welding (it take a lot of practice...nobody is born knowing how to weld), you will most likely move on to other projects involving material thicker than thin-wall tubing. At that point you will appreciate the features on the Miller, Hobart or Lincoln machines that may not be available on the others.

That's just my $0.02 worth. YMMV.

trikeman
05-03-2008, 07:34 AM
If you want a name brand welder, such as a Hobart, the best deals are the "A" refurbished welders at www.toolking.com (http://www.toolking.com) Lots of guys on the Hobart welding forum buy them and say they are like new when they get them. Often they are new, but perhaps were missing a knob or something and had to be sent back to the factory. Shipping is $8 from them. Sears just had a 15% off on theirs, as well. You definitely should build your own cart. That is a good way to get in some practice, before you weld something you are going to ride.

http://www.toolking.com/hobartwelders_500500a.aspx

I own a Hobart Handler 140, which I use to weld bikes, but if I had it to do over again, I would definitely step up to a 230v model, such as the HH 187 from toolking for $519. The 120 welders are fine for thin bicycle material, but sooner or later you will want to weld something much bigger. At my house, the 120 circuits in the garage were so weak that I had to make up a big extension cord to use mine on shielding gas. The practical limit for a 120v welder on gas is 1/8" and that is really pushing the little guy, unless you have a really strong 120v circuit. I would never try to welding something like a car trailer with it.

Its much easier to run long extension cords for a 230v welder (off the dryer circuit for example), since you can use smaller wire (cheaper) and run 100 feet if you want to, and you wont find yourself wishing for more power.

After struggling with my 120v wiring issues for some time, I finally bought a used Miller Thunderbolt (stick) and made up an 50 foot extension cord for my dryer. But, a 230 v wire feeder would have solved the problem in the first place. Just my $0.02.

TheKid
05-03-2008, 09:27 AM
Taking a chance with refurbished equipment often pays off. My stick welder from HF was refurbished, and I never had a problem with it. Reputable manufacturers will also back up a product that was refurbished and/or resold by an authorized dealer. In the 70's, one of my jobs was with Hoover. We'd go to department stores in Manhattan to repair the returns, and rebox with a "REFURBISHED" stamp. The repairs were always minor, like a broken belt, or a belt that slipped off the motor shaft. Better department stores took back machines if the bags were full. (In cases like that, the store demanded that we didn't put the refurbished stamp on the box.) In the two years I was there, I never encountered a machine that needed a major repair.
Thanks for the Toolking link. They seem to be a respectable outfit. No lowballing and sticking it to you with shipping.

trikeman
05-03-2008, 01:35 PM
By the way, for someone that never intends to use gas on their wire feed welder, the little Hobart 125EZ is very inexpensive and has gotten rave reviews for light duty by guys on the welding forum. These are guys that have enough welding fire power in their shops to weld battleships, so they know what a big welder can do also. Some examples of the 125EZ's work:

http://www.hobartwelders.com/weldtalk/showthread.php?t=29938&highlight=side+yard+125

http://www.hobartwelders.com/weldtalk/showthread.php?t=26787&highlight=125ez

TheKid
05-03-2008, 03:39 PM
Thanks for the links. I'm in the market for a different welder because the one I have leaves the wire hot whether you pull the trigger or not. There've been occasions when I forgot to turn the welder off before putting the gun down, or touching the bike frame with it while moving to a different position. It's a safety hazard. The Hobart 125EZ seems to fit the bill, and for a few bucks more than the Clarke, the Hobart seems the better choice. For the extra 11 bucks, I'll get the hub adapter for the 8" spools.

presyesc
05-03-2008, 04:04 PM
Thank you all for your advice and knowledge- I have much to consider. I appreciate being shown in the right direction so that I can make a smart purchase and get equipment that fits what I am doing.

TheKid
05-03-2008, 04:16 PM
I just went to Toolking and ordered the Hobart 125EZ, and the adapter for 8" spools. With shipping it was just under $300. Welding Depot seems to have the best price for 8" spools of 0.30 flux core wire. $60.35 with shipping. The 2lb. spools generally sell for $20 each, so this is a good savings. Consider that you usually lose 6'-8' of wire with each spool, you gain 24'-32' of wire by using the 10lb. spool as well.

trikeman
05-03-2008, 05:11 PM
Amen to the auto-darkening hood papa. I have enough trouble seeing without having to start in the dark.

TheKid
05-03-2008, 11:57 PM
I haven't used anything BUT an auto-darkening helmet. The first one was only 5 bucks more than the regular helmets. I bought a second that was a bit better quality than the first, figuring it's always good to have a spare. Now of course, I'm spoiled, and would never buy a helmet that wasn't auto-darkening.
I noticed that most people (including myself) would rather build their own cart, which makes perfect sense. I used bed frame that people threw in the trash. The cost of the cart was the wire and electricity to build it. I would suggest to those who are thinking of buying a welder and cart as a package, to build your own cart, and with the money you save, invest in clamps. Try to get as many different kinds as you possibly can. I have various squeeze clamps, magnets, vise-grip, and angle clamps, all of which were inexpensive and invaluable. Some I already had, but I bought most of them after I started welding. I doubt that I spent more than $40 or $50 total.
I recently found out that before my uncle was an executive with the Litton Corp., he was a welder. I jokingly asked him if he still remembers anything he could pass on. (He's 83, and was first promoted when he was in his 40's) He said rule #1 is, there's no such thing as too many clamps.

trikeman
05-04-2008, 01:29 AM
When I first got my welder last year, I was in the process of thinking about building a cart, when I found an old (and very greasy) mechanic's work cart at my local dump. I cleaned it up and turned the metal top tray upside down, so it would be flat and sanded the paint off. Here is an old picture of it with my welder, my autodark helmet, and the start of my DeltaWolf on it. I also mounted a vise on it.

By the way, if your house is electrically challenged like mine and papa's are and your one or two electrical outlets rated for 20 Amps are not where you weld, you can buy a heavy duty 50' #10 wire mobile home electrical extension cord at Harbor Freight for $29 right now. Cut off both ends and replace them with 20 Amp household outlet ends from Home Depot and you have a very nice low-voltage-drop 120v extension cord. Your welder will thank you for not using that crappy small wire extension cord anymore.

http://www.atlantamusclecars.com/Paint/Cart1.JPG

trikeman
05-04-2008, 03:08 AM
LOL. Didn't mean to imply you hadn't solved the problem at your house papa. However, many of the posts here are for those who come after us and are still struggling with the same issues we had to overcome.

TheKid
05-04-2008, 03:53 AM
On the advice of some electricians, I made a 50' extension cord from 12ga. romex, using a 20A plug and outlet. I noticed my current welder performs better and is less erratic than when I used the 100' stranded 14ga. extension cord. It's plugged into a 20A ground fault outdoor circuit.

trikeman
05-04-2008, 04:58 AM
On the advice of some electricians, I made a 50' extension cord from 12ga. romex, using a 20A plug and outlet. I noticed my current welder performs better and is less erratic than when I used the 100' stranded 14ga. extension cord. It's plugged into a 20A ground fault outdoor circuit.

Yes 100 feet of 14 ga was not enough for a 20 AMP load. Most experts recommend no more than a 3% drop, so 50 feet of #12 wire is just about the limit you can stand. My little Hobart 140 welded like crap when I was using too small a cord. It is much happier with my #10 ga cord. This little voltage drop calculator is handy.

http://www.jhlarson.com/ind_tables/volt/calc_voltdrop.htm

TheKid
05-04-2008, 05:31 AM
Thanks for the info. I may have to rerun the whole circuit with 10ga. I'll see how the new welder works first. That certainly is a handy calculator.

trikeman
05-04-2008, 08:40 AM
On the lower settings for 16ga steel you will probably be fine with #12 wire. I suspect the 125EZ may only pull about 10-12A (if that at the lower settings). It was trying to weld 1/8" steel using CO2 and the highest settings where I became very frustrated with my old dinky extension cord. With gas you need a few more volts on the circuit anyway, but the EZ won't have that problem. Of course when you start welding 1/8 tabs to bottom brackets, and the like, you may have to crank er up to maximum. Let us know how it comes out.

trikeman
05-05-2008, 11:58 AM
I may be following in Brad's footsteps soon on welders. Last year, I bought a used Miller Thunderbolt 230v AC/DC to play with. Until this weekend, I really haven't had much opportunity to use it like I have my Hobart 140.

This weekend I was in Harbor Freight to get a few clamps and other things, and I decided to buy some of those 1/16" 6013 rods. I set up the Thunderbolt on my back porch and ran the leads (it has monster long leads) into my backyard to a temporary welding table I set up there. Plugged the 50 foot 10-3 extension cord into my dryer and got out some 1/16" 1" tube to play with. All I can say is "Wow!" I do believe it was easier to weld that tube with the stick than it was with my 120V MIG. I mostly use flux core anyway, so I have lots of practice with smoke and sparks. I set it to about 65 Amps and got good penetration, with very few burn throughs. I tried some 1/8" rods on some 2" square 1/8" tubing and it was pretty easy too. I am really liking the stick.

To be fair, striking and holding the arc (you have to remember to keep moving the stick arm closer as the rod burns away) takes some practice, but once you get it down, it becomes automatic.

I know Brad said he went from stick to MIG and back again, and even to AC only. I am not sure I am ready for AC only, but I think my next bike will be built with the stick - just for the experience if nothing else. There is slag to chip off with the stick but hey we are welding 1"-2" welds here, so its not like a major chore. Who knows, maybe I will hang up my squirt gun.

So, don't be afraid of a stick welder, if you can't afford a big MIG.

TheKid
05-05-2008, 12:27 PM
I don't mind the stick, except for inside corners. I could never quite get to strike them right, and I always ended up sticking the electrode to the work. When I went to flux core, it was so much easier on the inside corners, so I just kept using it for almost everything. My stick welder is 110v, AC only, and at that, I can get up to 75 amps. I also found that 65 amps was good for 16 ga. steel. (I can convert it to 220v, but I'd have to run a new circuit.) What I like with the stick, is that it has variable amp settings, unlike my cheap flux core that has only minimum and maximum settings. As for slag, I see no difference between stick and flux core, so for those who have to weld outside where MIG with gas is a problem, stick welding may very well be the best choice. Since mine is AC only, sticking is the biggest problem. From what I've read, DC will reduce the chances of sticking significantly.

TheKid
05-05-2008, 04:40 PM
Thanks Papa. I tried all that, but I just stink at stick welding inside corners. I was told by the guy who was showing me some tricks of the trade that I'd be better off if my welder was able to weld with DC. When I got the flux core, I liked the ease of operation, so now I only use the stick welder for repairs of railings etc.

n9viw
05-06-2008, 01:22 PM
Kid, I used one of these to do 'faux DC' with my little 100A Harbor Freight stick welder: http://www.eastwoodco.com/jump.jsp?itemID=1187&itemType=PRODUCT . It allowed me a bit more control, but I didn't need it once I got my current AC/DC box.

While it has a 'self-starting arc' feature (an electronic somethingorother that jigs the rod up and down a fraction of an inch), I found it more irritating than anything- you go to strike an arc, and the gun starts buzzing in your hand... not exactly conducive to a calm weld! The 'reduction diode' does reduce the output by half, but since it's now sloppy semi-rectified DC, it runs a little better.

If you can catch it on sale, it goes for $40-50, or you can get them for $50 on ebay.

TheKid
05-06-2008, 01:40 PM
Nice item. I just ordered a Hobart 125 EZ, so I won't be stick welding bikes anytime soon.

trikeman
05-06-2008, 02:37 PM
A little correction on those 1/16" rods I bought at Harbor Freight. After actually reading the carton when I finished welding with them, I see they are 7014s. What a sweet soft arc that rod has and just the right thickness for 16ga tubing when set at about 65 Amps. If you want to stick some 16ga frame tubing give them a try. They are $5.46 for 2 pounds.

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=96813

n9viw
05-07-2008, 02:09 PM
I'm stopping off at HFT on the way home to get a new wheel for the wheelbarrow (had enough with patching the bloody tube, time to get a thornproof solid tire!), I'll have to pick up some of that 7014. I have their 1/16" in 6013 and 7018, but considering what I've been hearing about 7014, it will be a welcome addition.

meancoyote
05-20-2008, 11:01 PM
I have great luck with my 2 welders, one is a lincoln ac/dc 225, set up for stick and scratch start tig, and the other is a power mig 180c with a spoolgun for welding aluminum.
http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a63/meancoyote/100_4128.jpg

n9viw
05-21-2008, 01:38 PM
Hey Coyote, where'd you get your setup for the SS TIG? I've seen ditherings online for such a thing, but nobody has hard numbers, "get this part number, that hose, this other switch," etc.

meancoyote
05-21-2008, 09:51 PM
I just put all the parts together from here and there, not much to it, need a tig torch, water cooler (optional), flowmeter, argon, and powerblock. this setup has no footpedal or gas valve, but it will get you started. Im saving up for a lincoln precision tig 225 to replace my ac/dc 225, but it is what I got now, so its what I use.
here is a basic scratch start setup,
http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a63/meancoyote/100_4139.jpg
watercooler,
http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a63/meancoyote/100_4137.jpg
how I power it,
http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a63/meancoyote/100_4135.jpg
flowmeter,
http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a63/meancoyote/100_4140.jpg

Wood Butcher
05-22-2008, 03:48 AM
Nick,

I've also looked into converting a buzz box to SS TIG. A couple of links that you may or may not have seen....

A conversion kit:

http://tigdepot.net/products_details2_paypal_google.php?productid=197

I think one could do better on the price with some smart online and local shopping. But for the sake of convenience (that does matter to some), everything is is one place.

A low-buck conversion:

http://www.az-zbum.com/welder.upgrade.shtml


Mike

trikeman
05-22-2008, 08:06 AM
Why TIG? TIG is certainly nice to have when you need it, but unless you plan on welding lots of 4130, 6061 or titanium, it's an added expensive that'll be collecting dust. It's a slower welding process - takes longer to setup when you need it - and is essentially unsuitable for most of Brad's projects. And getting proficient with TIG isn't at all like stick or MIG - the learning curve is much steeper, meaning proper instruction is usually unavoidable.

BTW, a water cooled torch is unecessary below about 175 amps.

Judging from his equipment, he does other welding besides bicycles.

n9viw
05-22-2008, 08:10 AM
The main reason I'd like TIG is for aluminum. Also, I already have the head unit in the form of my Century 230/140 AC/DC stick welder. I've done TIG before, but not for a lot of years, but I really liked the delicate work I could do with it.

There exist such things as aluminum SMAW rods, but although I bought a few, I didn't get a chance to try them before the flux rotted off. DRY DRY DRY, these things need Sahara dry to stay in good shape. Time to build a hotbox. Also, they're pretty much useless for anything thinner than 1/4" plate, seeing as how it's SMAW, and I haven't seen them in any size thinner than 1/8".

If I had a MIG rig with a spool gun, I could spool MIG aluminum, but spool guns are pricey, and the Linde VI-253 MIG setup I have will be getting sold as soon as I clean it up some. I'll probably replace it with something like a Hobart Handler 140, with gas. That'll at least let me reach some of the things I can't do with the Century, like sheetmetal, and tacking braze-ons to a frame.

TheKid
05-22-2008, 05:24 PM
Since Coyote is a welder by trade, a good TIG welder is probably a must. But for most of us hackers, I have to agree with Papa. It's just not practical. After looking into using aluminum to build bikes, the cost and inconvenience of post welding treatment, along with the cost of TIG equipment and learning how to use it, isn't worth it. If I'm not mistaken, cromoly also requires post welding treatment, but I'm not sure of this. From what I've read, and from past experience, cromoly is probably better braised than welded. I used cromoly for the rear of the Meridian, and burn through was an issue, but I overcame it. I was able to reinforce it enough to get a strong unit. I wasn't so lucky when I built the original 26" suspension rear for the tadpole. That would have required more work than it was worth, so I just waited until I found a 26" suspension bike.

TheKid
05-22-2008, 11:24 PM
What I meant was, braising seems to be the better choice than stick, flux core, or MIG welding. From what I've read, braising and TIG are the viable choices for cromoloy.
Yes, the frames were very thin, I would say that .035 is a close assumption. It looked like it could be used to gap old spark plugs. Even set on low, burn through was an issue. I just kept welding a little at a time, allowing the metal to cool a bit before resuming. I was welding about 1/4" then switching to the other side of the frame. That stopped the burn through on the Meridian. On the tadpole, I used the same method, but it was a much different type of assembly. I kept getting cracks whenever there was stress. I think it may have been in trying to weld the very thin cromoly to the 3/16" plates that made up the pivot for the suspension. I was going to scrap the idea and build the rear from scratch with 1" square tube, but I decided to try and find a 26" suspension bike first. I found one that very same night. Sometimes, you just get lucky.

meancoyote
05-23-2008, 12:55 AM
What mig wire are you using for the cromoloy? I would use .020 4130 with argon at about 30 amps to start maybe. I have not tried it though. Instead of tig you could oxyacytlene weld it with 4130 filler? I am new to welding thin stuff, I weld on heavy construction equipment mostly.

meancoyote
05-23-2008, 01:11 AM
If I had a MIG rig with a spool gun, I could spool MIG aluminum, but spool guns are pricey, and the Linde VI-253 MIG setup I have will be getting sold as soon as I clean it up some. I'll probably replace it with something like a Hobart Handler 140, with gas. .


Lincoln has the powermig 140c (k2471-1) that can run a spoolgun (k2532-1)
I have the lincoln spoolgun for my 180c. I think the lincoln welders at home depot can run a spoolgun too? Now that im thinking I have heard the hobart handler can run the miller spoolmate 100? Not sure....miller and hobart have alot of the same parts? Anyway I like lincoln beter then the miller or hobart cuz you dont need a adaptor for the spoolgun. Just plug it in.

TheKid
06-06-2008, 08:33 AM
I ran a new 110v circuit with some #10 wire (luckily I still had some from years ago - the price of this stuff is outrageous!) to the back of the house - 27 ft. total run, and installed a new outdoor receptacle. I also bought a 12ga. 25' extension cord. What a difference! I can now weld on the low setting, which I couldn't do before. Thanks for the advice guys!

presyesc
06-18-2008, 03:07 AM
I decided to get a Hobart 125EZ and I received it in the mail yesterday. I'm brand new at welding and I'm already experiencing some perplexing problems. First, let me give the specs on what I'm using- .030 steel flux core on 1/16" to 3/16" steel flatbar and tubing. I'm in progress on building the Meridian recumbent. Compared to the photos in the manual, my bead looks a lot less quality- it protrudes quite a bit and the wire tip constantly "taps" the workpiece the whole time I'm welding. My neighbor said it might be that the specific outlet may be weak. I would really like the weld to look nice like in the manual, can this welder pull it off? Thanks a lot

trikeman
06-18-2008, 03:15 AM
I decided to get a Hobart 125EZ and I received it in the mail yesterday. I'm brand new at welding and I'm already experiencing some perplexing problems. First, let me give the specs on what I'm using- .030 steel flux core on 1/16" to 3/16" steel flatbar and tubing. I'm in progress on building the Meridian recumbent. Compared to the photos in the manual, my bead looks a lot less quality- it protrudes quite a bit and the wire tip constantly "taps" the workpiece the whole time I'm welding. My neighbor said it might be that the specific outlet may be weak, or you don't have a good ground. I would really like the weld to look nice like in the manual, can this welder pull it off? Thanks a lot

Pres - welding takes some practice, even with a wire welder. You can't expect the welds to look like the good ones in the manual until you have some experience. Most peoples first welds look like bird poop. You have to learn to watch the puddle and take your time.

If the wire is tapping (what is known as snubbing) the work piece it means either you don't have it turned up high enough, your tip has been grounded out so many times that you need to replace it, you have a bad ground, or your 120v circuit is weak. These welders need a good 20 Amp circuit. Good here meaning that you have a big enough wire in the circuit and are close enough to the main panel to provide sufficient voltage to the welder under load. When I first started welding with my little HH140, I found out the 15 Amp 120v circuit in my garage was just too weak to handle the welder well. To make matters worse, I was using an inadequate extension cord. This is a common problem (see the earlier parts of this thread). Once I fixed those problems, the difference was like night and day.

The 125EZ has gotten great reviews on the Hobart Forum from guys who know welders and weld every day. When guys like Dan and Rocky D over there say they love the 125EZ, I would not hesitate to buy one if I needed it. The 125EZ is a lot like my Hobart 140 on flux core(only a little less capable) and it will easily burn through material in the range you mentioned, although I usually don't try to weld more than 1/8" with my 140 in a single pass on flux core wire. The biggest problem I have on 16 ga tubing like that used on the Meridian is not blowing through, even on the low settings.

If you can post some pictures and describe your 120v circuit, and what settings you are using, it will help us get you on your way. You might also consider asking on the Hobart forum where a bunch of professionals and amateurs run that welder to make beautiful welds. The Hobart designers also participate in the discussion when they have something to add.

presyesc
06-19-2008, 03:56 PM
I have been practicing, and the welds have gotten better, and theres a couple that look good, but the trick for me is reproducing a good one at will, and not by luck. I moved the welder to the garage and plugged it directly into the wall. This outlet is the closest I can get to the electrical box. The snubbing has gone down some, but hasn't disappeared. I am also having some trouble with welding seams. Here are some pictures of my practice.

http://i302.photobucket.com/albums/nn101/teebster2003/IMG_1969.jpg
http://i302.photobucket.com/albums/nn101/teebster2003/IMG_1968.jpg

trikeman
06-19-2008, 05:02 PM
Those look pretty good for a beginner. Still, stubbing is a sign that you don't have enough power. Is there any way you can have someone check the out let voltage while you weld or have a heavy load on it?Did you clean the steel before you welded it?I know the welder is capable, so all I can think of is to check the connections, tips, etc. You might also make sure your tip is screwed in tight enough, and that your gun is too.

n9viw
06-19-2008, 05:27 PM
The first picture looks like not enough heat or too much wire speed; there's too much metal sitting on top of the work right there. The second set look better; the weld is flatter and smoother, bound to the work. I bet if you take shots of the underside of that piece, you'll find more evidence of heat penetration under the second set than the first one, indicating the weld penetrated the metal better in the second set than the first.
Good work, keep at it!
(EDIT: I agree with papa, I'd like to see some beads on 14-16ga down to 0.060, as that'll be closer to what you'll actually see on a bike. Or, just grab a scrap bike tube and try running some beads on it. That's what I plan to do, anyway!)

presyesc
06-19-2008, 05:27 PM
I'll look into getting the outlet checked out, and grab some thinner steel scrap. Hopefully the circuit has enough muscle for the job. Thanks for the help papa & trikeman

-Preston

trikeman
06-19-2008, 05:41 PM
pres - when I had problems with my HH 140, I had my son measure the outlet voltage (on the spare receptacle plug) while I welded. My voltage was way low (about 108v) and I didn't even measure it at the end of the extension cord. My house has a lot of spindly little 14ga circuits. You can also measure the voltage on the terminals of the welder inside the lid (at least on mine you can). With most flux core wire you need at least 12-14V DC to burn the wire, and with gas you need about 18v.

How thick is the metal in your pictures? I assume since you only have about 4 settings on the 125EZ, you have it set at the recommended setting for the metal thickness.

trikeman
06-19-2008, 06:09 PM
papa - if his Hobart 125 is anything like my 140 it will cut itself off if you exceed the duty cycle. I never worry about it, and have never hit it. It doesn't cause the wire to snub, it just quits feeding wire until it cools down.

Unfortunately, my Miller Thunderbolt does not have that kind of protection and you can burn it up by exceeding the duty cycle too much.

presyesc
06-20-2008, 02:49 PM
How thick is the metal in your pictures? I assume since you only have about 4 settings on the 125EZ, you have it set at the recommended setting for the metal thickness.

The metal is 3/16". I also have 1/16" scrap that I have worked on, however it can be difficult to not burn through once I get to the edge, even at the lowest setting, so I defiantly need to practice on that. It looks like the "snubbing" has actually reduced the more I practice, so perhaps it could be something on my part?

trikeman
06-20-2008, 03:01 PM
Did you ground the tip to the metal sometimes when you first started? If so, I would definitely try a new tip. I know when I do that and my tip goes bad it just won't weld the way it should. They cost less than a dollar.

n9viw
06-20-2008, 05:22 PM
I don't know the particulars about wire-feed welders, but the tip is simply a chunk of brass... how can it be harmed by grounding against the work? I could understand if the wire bore gets blocked, but a set of wire reamers such as are sold for gas tips can be used to clean it out to the right size.

trikeman
06-20-2008, 05:31 PM
I don't know the particulars about wire-feed welders, but the tip is simply a chunk of brass... how can it be harmed by grounding against the work? I could understand if the wire bore gets blocked, but a set of wire reamers such as are sold for gas tips can be used to clean it out to the right size.

It burns the tip's inside surface (connection to the wire) and then it won't arc as well. When you have a bad tip the wire feeder doesn't weld worth a darn - been there and done that. I have used the wire reamers, as well, but a new tip usually is faster and better and costs less than $1 at Home Depot (I use Lincoln tips in my Hobart). Once the person gets past grounding his tip all the time, they don't have to change tips often. When someone like presy doesn't know why his welder is snubbing, $1 is a cheap way to eliminate the tip as the source of the problem.

presyesc
06-20-2008, 05:49 PM
Did you ground the tip to the metal sometimes when you first started? If so, I would definitely try a new tip. I know when I do that and my tip goes bad it just won't weld the way it should. They cost less than a dollar.

I got an extra pack of tips when I bought the welder- I'll go ahead and replace it and see what happens.

-Preston

trikeman
06-22-2008, 10:46 AM
I got an extra pack of tips when I bought the welder- I'll go ahead and replace it and see what happens.

-Preston

presy - I hope you have your welder problems resolved now. If not, I would definitely try posting a question on the Hobart WeldTalk forum. I am constantly impressed with the fact that the Hobart factory technicians and engineers participate in that forum, and help resolve problems. If they cant' resolve it there, they will tell you who to call.

Here is an example, but a search for HH140, or snubbing etc will reveal many more.

http://www.hobartwelders.com/weldtalk/showthread.php?t=15163&highlight=hh140+tip&page=3