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mkane53
05-06-2009, 05:24 PM
Dual 700C wheels and some deviations from the plans (but really ... isn't that the whole point of building it yourself). Still needs paint of course but it turned out well and rides very well.

I probably won't paint if for a couple hundred miles to make sure the glue holds together. I just hate grinding through a nice finish to re-weld a joint. I originally built a trampoline seat but it's the wrong seat for this bike. At least if you ever need to put a foot on the pavement. So I swapped seats with my Meridian.

It's certainly a different machine than a Meridian. Not better or worse; just very different. One of my neighbors commented: "Living next to you is like living next to Doctor Frankenstein. I never know what the hell you're going to be rolling out of your garage." I got a real kick out of that.

Attached is a photo of the finished bike (sans paint) and a link to photos of the entire build project.

[Not exactly Sure Why the image isn't showing up but the link should work]
http://s261.photobucket.com/albums/ii54/mkane53/HighRoller%20Construction%20-%20Spring%202009/?albumview=grid&fullsize=P1000962.jpg


Here's a link to photos of the whole project.
Mike's HighRoller Construction Project (http://s261.photobucket.com/albums/ii54/mkane53/HighRoller%20Construction%20-%20Spring%202009/?albumview=grid)

trikeman
05-06-2009, 05:43 PM
Very nice build. I like how you used the existing frame members from the donor to the extent possible.

What tip and brazing rod (size, flux or fluxless) did you use on it?

mkane53
05-06-2009, 06:10 PM
Thanks

I just couldn't bring myself to totally deconstruct the rear triangle just to reassemble it again in only a slightly altered orientation. So I left the Chainstays, Seatstays and Dropouts and had to file and "adjust" things till they fit the main tube correctly.

For most of it I used a Victor Torch with a #1 Tip, 3/32" Flux-coated, Bronze Rod. Some areas (like brazing the lower join of the rear triangle) I used some paste flux to improve the wetting and flow.

I did MIG weld some things - like the mounting tabs on the bottom Bracket Assembly ... and a couple of other things as I recall. I used MIG on that because I wanted to keep the Heat Affected Zone and the time that it was being heated to an absolute minimum.

Greenhorn
05-06-2009, 06:50 PM
Can you do a closeup of your adjustable stem/handlebars. I tried a similar setup but couldn't get it to work. What locks your's in position?

trikeman
05-06-2009, 07:08 PM
Thanks. I am still trying to get my brazing down, so its useful to know what others are using. When you brazed the head tube in, did you heat the entire assembly up to cherry red, or do it in sections like we do when we are welding? I always tend to get the steel too hot and burn my flux. I bought some of the flux coated rods and hope to get a chance to try them this weekend.

mkane53
05-06-2009, 07:40 PM
I did it in sections but obviously since it's all connected when you've got one area hot enough that the brazing rod flows in nicely, the area immediately adjacent is almost as hot and only takes a bit of additional heat to get it just right.

It's easy to over heat and burn up your flux. I use a neutral flame (where the cones converge) that's really almost hot enough to weld with if you left the torch in the same place. I prefer to heat things up pretty quickly, get the bronze flowing into the joint and get out. Brazing isn't difficult once you get the hang of it. Like everything else, it's a skill that can be acquired with practice.

mkane53
05-06-2009, 09:09 PM
Greenhorn. I used two parallel tubing sections - the lower section that is clamped by the stem is the center portion of a set of handlebars. The upper portion is 3/4" conduit as it the tall section of the stem. The parallel sections of tubing are joined by two parallel steel plates.

The spacing between the two pieces of tubing has to be far enough to allow it to not interfere with the stem clamp - at least it does if you want it to be able to rotate forward.

Still needs to be cleaned up. I've got a lot of cleanup filing, etc to do before it's painted.

http://i261.photobucket.com/albums/ii54/mkane53/HighRoller%20Construction%20-%20Spring%202009/P1000972.jpg

mkane53
05-06-2009, 09:14 PM
Picture that didn't want to display earlier ...

http://i261.photobucket.com/albums/ii54/mkane53/HighRoller%20Construction%20-%20Spring%202009/P1000965.jpg

Greenhorn
05-06-2009, 09:44 PM
Thanks.


I have to say..your work puts my feeble efforts to shame. Nice brazing job. All your joints look neat, clean, and squared up

alecw35
05-07-2009, 04:42 AM
hey thats a cool stem set up
might have to fit hex headed bolts as access with an allen key might be difficult.

mkane53
05-07-2009, 05:45 AM
I leave the bottom clamp bolt relatively loose, tighten the top one until I start to feel a bit of resistance on the stem. Then I put the stem where I want it and tighten the bottom one, which firmly locks it in place. I've started leaving the stem ever so slightly loose, so that I can adjust it a little while I'm riding. Once I've put a few more miles on it and really figure out how it fits ME best, that probably won't be necessary, but it's actually rather nice to be able to adjust it a bit while riding.

fthills
05-09-2009, 11:38 AM
Very nice build and very helpful ,detailed series of photos. Thanks for taking the time to do this.

What a great idea for the jig !

The three orange chain guides where did you find them and what made you
choose that path for the chain to follow? It looks great because its so tidy and there's no chain sag anywhere.

Did you drill a hole in the mainframe square tube to fit the head tube ?

It looks fantastic now but it'll be superb with the paint on . Will you post photos when its been sprayed ??

taloch
05-09-2009, 02:02 PM
That's a great idea to use the rear triangle like that. Makes the build so simple, and looks good too.

Can't wait to see it with clothes (paint) on.

Radical Brad
05-09-2009, 05:39 PM
Ready to paint!

Brad

GregLWB
05-11-2009, 01:45 PM
Somehow I missed this thread before. Nice job on the frame. It looks sturdy. Can't wait to see it finished and get a ride report.:1eye:

I really like my HR and have been riding it alot for local stuff (when I'm not riding my TM). I think you are really going to enjoy yours too!:sunny:

Greg

graucho
05-11-2009, 02:09 PM
Thanks for sharing. Its a lot of work taking step by step photos. In turn, you help people realize these things are possible. Showing thats its a lot of baby steps. The bike is a great example to all. Great job.

mkane53
05-13-2009, 09:59 AM
Thanks to all for the kind words. So far I couldn't be happier with the way it's turned out and rides. I haven't put a lot of miles on it - just a few short 2 or 3 mile rides. Very nimble ride, especially compared to the Meridian.

I guess I need to start cleaning up the welds and getting it ready for paint.

Thanks to everyone on the forums for their help, great ideas and encouragement. It sure is a blast riding a bicycle that you've built yourself.

GregLWB
05-13-2009, 10:14 AM
It sure is a blast riding a bicycle that you've built yourself.

Absolutely Priceless!:jester: I can't wait till you get it painted and start riding it more so you can give a ride report.:)

Greg

mkane53
05-14-2009, 08:05 PM
Hey Greg, I've been meaning to tell you, the motor-assist Tourmaster you built is a terrific-looking bike. Looks like you churned it out in pretty much record time too. I keep looking at that tourmaster and thinking "Gotta make one of those." But I've already got a partially completed Tradewinds that I really need to finish up.



Absolutely Priceless!:jester: I can't wait till you get it painted and start riding it more so you can give a ride report.:)

Greg

GregLWB
05-14-2009, 08:12 PM
Hey Greg, I've been meaning to tell you, the motor-assist Tourmaster you built is a terrific-looking bike. Looks like you churned it out in pretty much record time too. I keep looking at that tourmaster and thinking "Gotta make one of those." But I've already got a partially completed Tradewinds that I really need to finish up.

Thanks, I really like the TM. My wife would like a tandem but due to her balance and ability to maintain a cadence, I think that I would feel more confident on a trike version of some kind.

I would like to see a completed tradewinds though.:jester:

Greg

mkane53
05-26-2009, 01:16 AM
The weather was terrific last Saturday (and Sunday) so I went ahead and Painted the new ride. It's not terribly clear but the paint scheme is primarily a deep Red fading to a deep purple rear triangle with black at the dropouts front and back. Very heavily metal-flaked and overcoated with several layers of clear for some depth. Of course I dropped one piece and chipped it right after that paint had flashed, so at least I've got the initial scratches out of the way.

Here are a couple of pictures showing the painted components:

http://i261.photobucket.com/albums/ii54/mkane53/HighRoller%20Construction%20-%20Spring%202009/P1000977.jpg

http://i261.photobucket.com/albums/ii54/mkane53/HighRoller%20Construction%20-%20Spring%202009/P1000979.jpg


http://i261.photobucket.com/albums/ii54/mkane53/HighRoller%20Construction%20-%20Spring%202009/P1000986.jpg

mkane53
05-26-2009, 01:29 AM
And here are a couple after the final assembly ... well I need to make a different seat but as we all know, these things are NEVER really done. Turned out pretty well though if I do say so myself.

http://i261.photobucket.com/albums/ii54/mkane53/HighRoller%20Construction%20-%20Spring%202009/P1000988.jpg

http://i261.photobucket.com/albums/ii54/mkane53/HighRoller%20Construction%20-%20Spring%202009/P1000990.jpg

http://i261.photobucket.com/albums/ii54/mkane53/HighRoller%20Construction%20-%20Spring%202009/P1000991.jpg

And here's a link to the entire build project ... with the Painting photos at the end.

http://s261.photobucket.com/albums/ii54/mkane53/HighRoller%20Construction%20-%20Spring%202009/?albumview=grid

Mitdan
05-26-2009, 04:15 AM
I like the way you added your personal touches and that's what attracted me to the HR. It's like a clean sheet of paper and you can draw whatever you want. I hope you enjoy it a long time.

GregLWB
05-26-2009, 09:59 AM
Cool! How does it ride?

Greg

mkane53
05-26-2009, 10:35 AM
Really terrific. When I go from the HR to the Meridian or back it takes me a bit to get used to the handling differences, but after a couple hundred yards I get my sea legs. I'll take it on my 30 mile Sunday Morning loop this weekend which is sort of my acid test.

I've taken a number of 6 mile loops and so far it's great.



Cool! How does it ride?

Greg

Radical Brad
05-26-2009, 12:35 PM
Well done, and great colors!

Brad

KoolKat
05-26-2009, 12:43 PM
Shaweet - kudos! Be sure to send a couple of pictures for the gallery. Hope to do another update this week!

* one or two high resolution, sharp, clear .JPG pictures of your completed and painted projects
* ensure that each picture is no more than 2MB in size, please
* one picture will be for the thumbnail (about 150 dpi)
* one picture will be for the full size picture (684 dpi)
* the name(s) of your completed and painted projects
* your name
* your location (state/province and country)

The purpose of the gallery is to show various works from around the world to inspire and amaze other amateur builders. gallery@atomiczombie.com

Patrike
05-26-2009, 12:52 PM
That's a long kick stand -- what did you make it out of :jester:.

Great build - like how you blended the paint.

comreich
05-26-2009, 01:04 PM
Dude, that's fantastic, and the best use of a golf club I've seen in ages.

mkane53
05-26-2009, 01:05 PM
That's my Popeil (as seen on TV) Combination Putter-Kickstand-Riding Crop ... and because I acted quickly it came with a free Cap Snaffler. Hell I never could Putt with the stupid thing. I may have photoshop that out in the glamour shots.

Thanks for you comments all.


That's a long kick stand -- what did you make it out of :jester:.

trikeman
05-26-2009, 01:40 PM
That's my Popeil (as seen on TV) Combination Putter-Kickstand-Riding Crop ... and because I acted quickly it came with a free Cap Snaffler. Hell I never could Putt with the stupid thing. I may have photoshop that out in the glamour shots.

Thanks for you comments all.

ROFL. Gotta love it. Nice paint job too.

Wingman
05-26-2009, 10:28 PM
Mike,
Nice job man! Love the little touches like the brazed on cable stops!:punk:
You gotta let me know how it climbs hills. I ride a century every year on my Cannondale DF and every year I vow to switch to an AZ bent. Got a Tourmaster framed up but not completed before this years ride this past weekend. During the ride on my trusty DF I realized there was no way I was going to push the TM up a bunch of hills over a 100 mile course and survive. For the first time, I actually appreciated the lightness and handling of my wedgie (which really threw me for a loop). I'm thinking about upping my century rides per season and wonder if the High Roller is my answer for speed, agility and hill climbing ability? BTW, how does it handle those dreaded natural expansion cracks on the blacktop roads-those are killers on my DF.

Thanks!

Wingman

Odd Man Out
05-26-2009, 11:43 PM
I realized there was no way I was going to push the TM up a bunch of hills over a 100 mile course and survive. Wingman


Wingman
Dunno if you have experience on a bent yet -- if not may I suggest you do a forum search under the words "spin" and "spinning". Remember spin and never push.

Another public service announcement from Doctor OMO

mkane53
05-27-2009, 12:30 AM
Well, I've done a lot of 80 + mile rides on my Meridian, including some hellacious hills. No question you go up hills more slowly. However, after about 70 miles on an upright, my neck is on fire, my hands are numb and my crotch ... well you get the idea. After 70 or 80 miles on a recumbent, I still feel pretty fresh, because it's so much more comfortable. As OMO said you've got to spin spin spin your way up a hill.

I did a 7 day (really 5 or 6 riding days) 400+ mile ride hauling camping gear the whole way last year and felt like I could have easily gone twice that distance. There are just a lot more factors involved than simply weight.

If you look here on Atomic Zombie under the long wheel base - Meridian section you'll see a post called "The Long Ride" which shows pictures from and a summary of that trip. So don't discount a century on a bent. It's a lot easier than you might think.

Yeah, the expansion cracks are killers. That's true on every bike I've ever been on - upright or recumbent. Proof enough that county road commissioners don't ride bicycles.






During the ride on my trusty DF I realized there was no way I was going to push the TM up a bunch of hills over a 100 mile course and survive. For the first time, I actually appreciated the lightness and handling of my wedgie (which really threw me for a loop). I'm thinking about upping my century rides per season and wonder if the High Roller is my answer for speed, agility and hill climbing ability? BTW, how does it handle those dreaded natural expansion cracks on the blacktop roads-those are killers on my DF.

Thanks!

Wingman

Wingman
05-27-2009, 12:10 PM
Thanks Mike and OMO!

My wife has a BikeE with a Cane Creek air shock that I will occasionally borrow to take on some 20 to 40 mile jaunts. It is an excellent design for general riding, but a little short in the speed department. The air shock really smooths out the bumps-my wife appreciates that feature. It climbs pretty well with the small rear wheel and proper gearing. (BTW, looking forward to the AZ version of the BikeE someday).

I have some limited experience on LWB and SWB USS 26/20 wheel Vision style bents. I remember having to gear so low climbing a good hill on the LWB that my forward speed ws not fast enough to keep me from tipping over. I believe I had better results with the SWB, but don't recall doing the same hilly route with that one. I'll check out your Long Ride Section Mike.

Thanks for the feedback. What a great group of cycle nuts!

Wingman

mkane53
06-02-2009, 08:35 AM
I took my new HighRoller out on my usual Sunday-morning 30 Mile Ride. 15 miles out to a conveniently located diner with poor service and bad food for breakfast; 15 miles back on the "Heartburn Half" of the ride - which is always slower ... hauling that Denver Omelette and short stack of pancakes back with me.

The weather was absolutely perfect. Crystal clear blue skies, almost no wind. A glorious spring day for a ride in Chicago-land.

What I noticed right off is that the HighRoller is easy to ride fast, at least compared to my Meridian. I have to say that I think the Meridian is more comfortable, or maybe I'm just not quite used to the HighRoller yet. Not that the HighRoller is uncomfortable - it's not. But speed-wise there's no comparison. The HighRoller Rocks!

My HighRoller has 700C Wheels on both ends, so it's pretty tall. Rolling from a stoplight can be challenging, but when you're actually rolling down the road, you actually FEEL like you're riding in a tuck - like you have the wind profile of an egg. It's noticeably more aerodynamic than anything else I've ever ridden. It's a bit like riding on a set of rollers, where you can click a gear or two up without much difference in the load on your legs because your air resistance hasn't changed. Almost the same feeling on the HighRoller. Once you upshift and get the crank back up to tempo, you feel like the air resistance hasn't really changed much. It's amazing. My handlebars are set up so that I can adjust them fore and aft while riding. So, once I hit speed, I pulled the handlebars back so that my elbows were tucked in right at my sides and put my hands in the middle of the handlebars and just cruised.

Because there are so many stop signs, stop lights and cross streets on the near part ride, it's almost impossible to calculate an accurate average speed. There are a couple of 3 to 4 mile unbroken stretches on the outward end of the trip. I was averaging about 17 - 18 mph during that stretch. And that's MUCH faster than the 13.5 or so that I average on my Cannondale upright. I don't know that I could average that speed over a 50 mile ride, but my legs aren't yet acclimated to this bike either. I did notice that my legs were more tired during the last 3 or 4 miles than they normally are and attributed that to the significantly different ride position and the way that loaded my legs.

One thing that I did notice without question. There were tons of people out riding that morning because the weather was so gorgeous. When riding the Meridian people almost don't give you a second look. (There are a lot of LWB recumbents on the streets around here.) On the HighRoller, people really took notice and frequently made comments: "Oh yeah, that's what I'M talkin' about!" It was pretty funny.

Anyway, that's the ride report. Very smooth, very fast, pretty sensitive steering. Not quite as comfortable as a Meridian but a lot faster. It's going to take a while to build the right leg muscles for long-haul riding.

trikeman
06-02-2009, 12:20 PM
Great report Mike. Those HighRollers are definitely fast. I did a 40 miler this morning on my little RANS Wave. About 5 miles in I stopped to talk to a guy on a Bacchetta Corsa 700cc. I ended up riding with him for the next 15 miles out. My little legs were spinning the tiny 20" wheel the whole way at 90 rpm in high or next-to-high gear and he looked like he was always just barely trying.

comreich
06-03-2009, 10:16 AM
Excellent report Mike. Not sure I could handle 700's on my high roller. Even after putting 300 miles or so on mine, it's a bit challenging to start again after stopping. But it's definitely a go-fast machine.

Like you, I've really noticed the tight steering which can be a handful at times. I'm still tempted to try out one of the Bacchetta's at one local bike shop to see what they ride like.

mkane53
06-03-2009, 06:03 PM
Thanks guys.

I'm not sure I'd call the steering "Twitchy" exactly because I never felt like the bike was controlling me, but "Extremely Nimble" certainly isn't an exaggeration.

Yeah, I'm thinking about trying out a Bacchetta myself. I want to put a few more miles on my own bike so I get it's handling really engrained before I try something else.


Like you, I've really noticed the tight steering which can be a handful at times. I'm still tempted to try out one of the Bacchetta's at one local bike shop to see what they ride like.