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mydriatic
04-22-2009, 09:12 PM
Hi guys, I've been reading your posts on this forum and was wondering what your opinon was regarding the "easiest" AZ build. I have both books but it appears that the high roller or meridian would be the simplest to procure parts and build. I'm interested in building a bike that will do well on hills for the MS 150 charity tour and be able to fit inside a CR-V

What do you guys think?

GregLWB
04-22-2009, 10:52 PM
Hi guys, I've been reading your posts on this forum and was wondering what your opinon was regarding the "easiest" AZ build. I have both books but it appears that the high roller or meridian would be the simplest to procure parts and build. I'm interested in building a bike that will do well on hills for the MS 150 charity tour and be able to fit inside a CR-V

What do you guys think?

I haven't built many like some of these guys but the HR was fun to build and I chose it because I thought it would be a good starter project. With that said I built my TourMaster in two weekends and now just need to prep and paint it.

I don't know if that is because I had already done a project and am getting better, but it seemed much easier.:jester:

IMO, if you are going to ride a long distance and want comfort and stability a long wheel base or a trike are the way to go.

Greg

Greenhorn
04-22-2009, 11:24 PM
Hi guys, I've been reading your posts on this forum and was wondering what your opinon was regarding the "easiest" AZ build. I have both books but it appears that the high roller or meridian would be the simplest to procure parts and build. I'm interested in building a bike that will do well on hills for the MS 150 charity tour and be able to fit inside a CR-V

What do you guys think?

IMHO none of these are "easy." the high roller, which is my first and only (and uncompleted) build is by far the least mechanically complex. But that does not mean it has been "easy" to build. (That doesn't mean it hasn't been much fun doing it). I don't know your background, but with any of these, there will be a lot of trial and error, mistakes, cussing, etc......but it is VERy rewarding and fun. I wouldn't look at it in terms of which is "easiest" (although i admit that is what i did when I embarked on this crazy journey).

my two cents is to think about what type of bike you want, what you will use it for, and then build the one that best suits your purposes.

build the bike you want. it may seem daunting at first, but little by little you will get there.

That said, there is no way I (having no previous mechanical training/skills) could have built a trike right off the bat. For me, the highroller was the best to start with. I am committed to doing another one. If this is your first build, I think the highroller is a great choice, as I think it is the least complex and also is probably the easiest to modify....just look at all the different bikes people build off the same plans here.


i hope this helps. Whatever you decide, I am sure it will be fun (but also a lot of hard work.)

mydriatic
04-23-2009, 12:18 AM
Thanks guys,

Meridian-HR-Meridian-HR. I've read a couple posts suggesting having the cranks a little lower than your seat will be more comfortable for longer distances while sacrificing aero benefits. The Meridian also seems very similar to the tourmaster and may require less parts. The HR a bike of simplicity. I have no welding/bike building experience. Though I have screwed in a water bottle cage before.

I'm also wondering if I'll have adequate space in my garage. I don't want to set it on fire due to sparks. I've read that they can fly up to 35 ft (not great for curtains, any thing wooden, etc).

Either way thanks for the advice. Sorry if this post isn't in the right forum. I was leaning toward the HR at the time.

TheKid
04-23-2009, 04:44 AM
I found the Meridian the easiest to build for me so far, but the Tourmaster may be even easier because you don't have to build the rear fork. That said, once the rear of the Meridian is in place, the rest of the build is straightforward and simple. Both have the BB lower than the seat, which is great for those of us with back, hip, and/or knee problems. If the Tourmaster was available at the time, I probably would have chosen it over the Meridian.

trikeman
04-23-2009, 08:00 AM
mydriatic - there is no need to build your bike inside. I built my DW completely outside in my driveway using a fluxcore wire in my welder (lots of smoke and sparks). Others have used inexpensive stick welders. You do need some sort of rudimentary bench such as a Workmate, or something like the modified mechanics cart I found at the dump. Turning the top over to make it flat and putting a vise on it made it perfect for grinding, welding and fitting on. The iron filings from grinding will turn your driveway orange though.

http://www.atlantamusclecars.com/Paint/Cart1.JPG

I also had never welded before.

jimFPU
04-23-2009, 08:02 AM
After the first one they all get easier. I built a Delta Wolf (the Baby Wolf (http://forum.atomiczombie.com/showthread.php?t=1118) and cool (http://forum.atomiczombie.com/showthread.php?t=1554)) and have started a Street Fox (http://forum.atomiczombie.com/showthread.php?t=1308) and somewhere on this forum I have the beginnings of a Street Fighter (maybe in one of Joey's threads...can't find it right now!)

Anyway, I started welding last summer and now look at me. Just pick the welder up and throw sparks!! Post the results and get feedback. Zombies really like pics! Lots of pics!! The guys here will give tons of advice, and most of it will just be to go practice more!

This hobby is addicting though, and before you know it the build may be more fun than the ride!!:scooter:

comreich
04-23-2009, 10:48 AM
I can't comment on the Meridian or TourMaster, but between the LWB (http://comreich.ods.org/~reich/long_bike/img_3503.jpg) and my high racer (http://comreich.ods.org/~reich/highracer/2009-04-13_highroller3.jpg), my high racer went together the quickest. I had a ridable machine in about a week elapsed time -- about 12 hours duration. Getting it to a finished state required much more time because I changed the front end three times and changed the seat entirely

The LWB took a while longer because I was brazing it instead of welding. The construction method documented by adc at recycledrecumbents makes for an almost self-aligning system so it's fairly easy to get the main frame straight the first time. But the forks and the rear triangle are definitely the fiddly bits.

Comfort-wise, the LWB is definitely a more cushy ride given that it's 8 feet long (6' wheelbase) and has relatively wide tires. But I wouldn't count out the High Roller either. My plan is to start commuting on it with a round trip of about 30 miles and I think the back support alone will make it a very comfortable ride.

GregLWB
04-23-2009, 10:59 AM
Thanks guys,

Meridian-HR-Meridian-HR. I've read a couple posts suggesting having the cranks a little lower than your seat will be more comfortable for longer distances while sacrificing aero benefits. The Meridian also seems very similar to the tourmaster and may require less parts. The HR a bike of simplicity. I have no welding/bike building experience. Though I have screwed in a water bottle cage before.

I'm also wondering if I'll have adequate space in my garage. I don't want to set it on fire due to sparks. I've read that they can fly up to 35 ft (not great for curtains, any thing wooden, etc).

Either way thanks for the advice. Sorry if this post isn't in the right forum. I was leaning toward the HR at the time.

You will probably end up building more than one.:jester:

I really like my HR (26/20) and built it for shorter around town trips. With the 20" on the front my feet are about level with my hips and I am really enjoying riding it (a couple miles almost every day since I built it). It will also fit on a rack on the front of a bus.

The Meridian and some others look really cool, but you have to decide what this bikes primary purpose will be. The low slung bikes are fast and good for long rides but if you are going to commute, especially in city traffic I can promise you that you will want to be higher off the ground.

I commute a lot (53 mile round trip) and it is divided between small town, highway and city traffic. I currently do that on a LWB bike that is similar in dimensions and layout to the meridian (26/20). One of the reasons that I decided to build the TM is the 26" front tire and it's ability to absorb more road vibration (more tire choice). Longer trips and commuting are about comfort and being seen! If you aren't comfortable you won't do it for very long and if you can't be seen ..... well I think that speaks for itself.

IMHO, I think your best bet is to find a LBS near you that sells recumbents and go test ride different styles. Find the one that feels right to you and then make a choice on your build.

Sorry for the rant.:jester:

Greg

Greenhorn
04-23-2009, 11:02 AM
I have no welding/bike building experience. Though I have screwed in a water bottle cage before.

I'm also wondering if I'll have adequate space in my garage. I don't want to set it on fire due to sparks. I've read that they can fly up to 35 ft (not great for curtains, any thing wooden, etc).

Either way thanks for the advice. Sorry if this post isn't in the right forum. I was leaning toward the HR at the time.

I use a fluxcore welder in SWMBO's small condo garage. No fires yet. I remember reading that 35 feet figure and being concerned as well. While I have seen sparks fly across the garage--I have not seen any go 35 feet. Just be sure to weld as close to the opening as possible and you should be fine.

Give yourself a few weeks to practice welding before starting. At first it seems difficult, but the technique is pretty easy to get down, and then it just becomes second nature (not that my welds are pretty or that I dont stick my wire every other pass) :)

comreich
04-23-2009, 11:30 AM
I've had a problem with the 35', but not from the welder. The sparks from the welder seem to fall pretty quickly; not so much with the grinder:evilgrin: I didn't like the sparks spraying my garage door, so I would leave it open after moving my wife's van onto the driveway. Later she asked me why the wipers weren't working too well and I discovered a whole mess of little black specs embedded in the windshield :(. Needless to say, I replaced the windshield and proceeded to move the van off the driveway and onto the street -- about 30' away. My car still gets sprayed a little bit which probably explains the little rust spots in plastic parts. D'oh!

pcorbett
04-23-2009, 07:21 PM
I have built the Meridian, Tourmaster, Highroller, Hammerhead, aTallbike, some other recumbents, and of late a Sex Change:eek:. Like what Greg said it does get easier the more you do it. Don't sweat the small stuff, go at your own pace, and enjoy the build. There is a lot of knowledge kicking around here with Zombies eager to help you through the project.

I ride and enjoy my Tourmaster the most but ride the HammerHead more. They are all great rides.

The easiest build was the Highroller.

As far as sparks go I have lots but I have only lit up my wood bench. No biggie, it goes out quickly:rolleyes4:

Enjoy your builds'

Pete

mydriatic
04-24-2009, 12:46 AM
Again, thanks for the advice and support. I missed the fact that the tourmaster has a 26" front wheel. I was wondering what the major difference between the Meridian and Tourmaster. I thought the TM just had a more robust frame. Also, I didn't even notice that the rear triangle on the TM is made already. I get hyponotized by the 'simple' beam lines of the HR & Meridian. I also didn't realize the Meridian was lower than the TM.

I've been calling around a few local welding places for square tubing. Hopefully I'll be diving in a couple of weeks.

Thanks for the help with bike designs and welding tips. I couldn't have come to a better site. As I've seen on other threads, your support is great - you guys don't let anyone go it alone - I certainly appreciate that. I may have to set up a web cam when I'm welding.

I've now 'narrowed' may choices between HR-Meridian-Tourmaster. :rolleyes4:

And I think I remember reading someone telling GreenHorn that soon enough, you'll be giving advice to newbies...

mydriatic
04-24-2009, 10:02 PM
Ok, now to really make this thread misplaced, I'm really leaning toward a Meridian with road tires 26/20 (Bmx slick) There isn't a reason why I couldn't switch up the tires right?

MS 150: 75 miles per day with hills
I'm hoping this bike can fit in a CR-V
Road tires to make the bike glide thru the 150 miles.
And I definitely do not want to ride the MS 150 on an upright any more.

The HR may not be as comfortable.
The TM may not fit in the car, may be slightly heavier (appears to have more members/beams)

Thanks. I may download the plans this weekend! Feel free to send anymore input as it is always appreciated.

GregLWB
04-25-2009, 12:15 AM
Ok, now to really make this thread misplaced, I'm really leaning toward a Meridian with road tires 26/20 (Bmx slick) There isn't a reason why I couldn't switch up the tires right?

MS 150: 75 miles per day with hills
I'm hoping this bike can fit in a CR-V
Road tires to make the bike glide thru the 150 miles.
And I definitely do not want to ride the MS 150 on an upright any more.

The HR may not be as comfortable.
The TM may not fit in the car, may be slightly heavier (appears to have more members/beams)

Thanks. I may download the plans this weekend! Feel free to send anymore input as it is always appreciated.

The Meridian may not be as tall as the Tourmaster but it is still going to be at at least 8 feet long (tire to tire). You might want to do some measuring or look into a tandem rack for the top of your rig. Good luck.

Also there are some good high pressure tires out there in 26 or 20 x 1.35 or 1.5 that roll really good. Personally I would go with the 1.5 as the ride won't be so harsh. My 2 cents.

Greg.

mydriatic
04-25-2009, 12:47 PM
Guys, yes I'm a pain. When I was posting another thread I saw the wildkat. I read the description and it mentioned that it takes donor parts and elec. conduit, no square tube that I can see.

Greg, You're building the TM. Does it require square tube or just donor parts and conduit. I'm looking for easy/cheap material access. So the TM may be moving up the list and if I throw simplicity out the door, may go with the USS WildKat.

Thanks for the tire tips. I'll measure the CR-V. 8 feet yikes, I'll have to make sure the wheels are quick release.

GregLWB
04-25-2009, 01:17 PM
Guys, yes I'm a pain. When I was posting another thread I saw the wildkat. I read the description and it mentioned that it takes donor parts and elec. conduit, no square tube that I can see.

Greg, You're building the TM. Does it require square tube or just donor parts and conduit. I'm looking for easy/cheap material access. So the TM may be moving up the list and if I throw simplicity out the door, may go with the USS WildKat.

Thanks for the tire tips. I'll measure the CR-V. 8 feet yikes, I'll have to make sure the wheels are quick release.

myd - The TM doesn't require any square tube. The reasons I used it were:
I'm a big guy (6'8" and ~300 lbs)
The donor front end had rectangular tube and I thought it would match better.
I had enough left over after I built the HR.

Before you build an underseat steer two wheeled bike I would go to a bike shop and test ride one. Lots of people like them but I couldn't get used to it on a two wheeled bike. Now on a trike, I really like USS.:jester:

Greg

Greenhorn
04-25-2009, 02:23 PM
sqaure tubing is cheap online. Onlinemetals.com or metalsdepot.com

they were at least 1/2 as much as the local shops wanted to charge

TheKid
04-25-2009, 05:35 PM
It's the shipping that kills you. If you order from metals depot, order the full lengths, then in the instructions, tell them you want them to cut for UPS. It's so much cheaper, and you'll have plenty for your next project. When you order that way, the shipping charges will be enormous, because full lengths are charged freight. Don't worry about it. You'll get an email with the UPS costs, not the freight costs.

mydriatic
04-25-2009, 10:02 PM
All good tips.
I may have to pick the TM or WildKat just for the availability of metal currently (I have a donor bike plus conduit) as I want to start just after mother's day activities - I can't be building a bike for myself and ignore SWMBO. Thanks for the advice on materials.

The websites are great too, thanks. Considering I'm in NewEngland I'll have to check out which shipping rates are better from either web site onlinemetals vs metaldepot.com Your right, the freight shipping is killer! I'm a little tentative to send my CC# pick a freight rate, put in a "Cut for UPS" and hope they remember to chose UPS rates (It's about $70 difference I imagine)
I'm sure if I order know, I'll have the material for a Meridian before Mom's day.

I do want to get the square tubing for the StreetFox eventually anyways (thinking too far ahead I know - I haven't even welded/cut anything yet)

Test riding is aways smart even if I don't aways pick the smartest method. I probably will stay with simplicity and go with std steering. Again I was thinking ahead and thought it would be good practice to do USS if I want the streetfox to be USS.

Yet another question: It's hot rolled steel I want, correct? and has anyone used elec. conduit? From forum searches, it seems I just have to get rid of any galvanized treatment without sucking up fumes and start welding like it's a bike tube. Any suggestions on conduit? It just doesn't seem that it would be that strong.

I can't say I'm usually this indecisive but then again, I never thought I'd be actually thinking I'd build my own bike. Then again a several years ago I never thought I'd put my own PC together either.

I may have to just buy all the plans...

GregLWB
04-25-2009, 10:30 PM
All good tips.
Considering I'm in NewEngland

I do want to get the square tubing for the StreetFox eventually anyways (thinking too far ahead I know - I haven't even welded/cut anything yet)

and has anyone used elec. conduit? From forum searches, it seems I just have to get rid of any galvanized treatment without sucking up fumes and start welding like it's a bike tube. Any suggestions on conduit? It just doesn't seem that it would be that strong.

I may have to just buy all the plans...

myd - Where in New England? Lots of good steel suppliers in New England and several Zombies as well.:builder2:

I know what you mean. I have the tubing sitting in my garage for my next three projects. I used conduit for the top tube that my seat and pilot's headtube are welded to on the TM. It is rock solid.

You will end up buying all the plans - this is addictive.:jester:

Greg

mydriatic
04-26-2009, 12:07 AM
I'm on the MA/RI border.

OK. It looks like the 8' bike is not going to fit. Arhhhh!

I'm back to SWB. :rolleyes4:

Do you guys think a Highroller is basically a Bandito with a 26" front wheel? I'm back to the HR but want to keep the bottom bracket closer to the ground for visibility and to get my foot down easier (clipless pedals). Both the Bandito and the HR look straightforward to build but a front 20" wheel may make it more comfortable and easier to see. I could build a HR and put a 20" wheel on it or go the bandito way. I almost said I'd build the KoolKat since it's in the book but it doesn't have a front derailleur (and I want lots of gears - it's mental thing)

GregLWB
04-26-2009, 12:29 AM
I'm on the MA/RI border.

OK. It looks like the 8' bike is not going to fit. Arhhhh!

I'm back to SWB. :rolleyes4:

Do you guys think a Highroller is basically a Bandito with a 26" front wheel? I'm back to the HR but want to keep the bottom bracket closer to the ground for visibility and to get my foot down easier (clipless pedals). Both the Bandito and the HR look straightforward to build but a front 20" wheel may make it more comfortable and easier to see. I could build a HR and put a 20" wheel on it or go the bandito way. I almost said I'd build the KoolKat since it's in the book but it doesn't have a front derailleur (and I want lots of gears - it's mental thing)

Look at my build thread. My HR does have a 20" wheel on it. Brad gives the info in the plans to make that modification.:) http://forum.atomiczombie.com/showthread.php?t=2038

Greg

mydriatic
04-26-2009, 01:42 AM
Nice job on the HR. That is what I think I'll need to build. It definitely edges the bandito in the Looks dept. And from my forum searches I've seen it before. I should have known what a HR 26/20 was since I was thinking of a 26/20 meridian. :dunce2:

Unless I'm afflicted with more lame brainess, I'm going with the HR.

Have you used clipless pedals on any of your recumbents?
How's the visibility on the HR?

Thanks. I think I'm finally at my decision.

trikeman
04-26-2009, 07:39 AM
Have you used clipless pedals on any of your recumbents?


I have used clipless (Eggbeaters) on my RANS LWB, but I don't recommend them when you are first learning to ride a recument. Riding a bent is different than riding a wedgie, especially the start. It takes some time to become accustomed to it. Once you learn to ride a bent, I do recommend clipless, because you don't want your foot slipping off and turning into leg-suck.

mydriatic
04-26-2009, 10:29 AM
looking up 'leg suck'....

OK, got it. I never knew there was such a thing!

Yeah. This is how smart I am. I installed clipless pedals and then did the MS 150. Almost fell off with my feet locked in when my chain came off on a hill :dunce2:

GregLWB
04-26-2009, 03:35 PM
Have you used clipless pedals on any of your recumbents?
How's the visibility on the HR?

Thanks. I think I'm finally at my decision.

I personally don't use clipless pedals on any of my bents. When I build a trike I will definately use them but I don't feel confident on a two wheeled bent with them. I use old school BMX platforms with studs on my bikes. My feet don't slip and in city traffic I don't have to mess around at stops and starts.:jester:

Many people really like clipless and I am not knocking them. On a long ride like you are planning they would probably be really helpful.

Visibility is great on my HR. Of course my seat position is a little more 'closed' than some others. You may want an opinion from someone who rides a little more reclined.

Greg

mydriatic
04-26-2009, 04:11 PM
The deed is done... @least ordering the HR plans anyways. I didn't see any yard sales this weekend but I plan on calling, ordering, and scrounging for parts this week.

comreich
04-26-2009, 09:55 PM
I have clipless on both my "riding" bents. My trike has platforms until I get it operational again. And Trikeman has a point. Riding a bent is a little different and you want to be comfortable before you put clipless pedals on. But before you ask, yes, I put my clipless pedals on and rode with them long before I was comfortable with the bikes :) What's thrown me off is I also moved the cleats toward the back of the shoe instead of directly under the ball of the foot which is the more normal positioning. This is based on advice from BROL and is supposed to help alleviate hot-foot. Not sure if that's the case, but I may end up moving the cleats back as I find its hard to get my feet clipped in again.

sksound5
04-26-2009, 11:40 PM
try freecycle in your area to get bikes, I got two great mountain bikes(didn't use for project, to nice) and 5 tenspeeds for free, also craigs list under free section, garage sales that didn't pan out are good free source. Some nice part bikes for cash in craigslist under bike section. Sometimes you can get multiples for good price at one stop. good luck

mydriatic
04-27-2009, 12:03 AM
Thanks for the advice,

I passed up 2 free bikes last year because they looked to crumby.

Greg. Did you adjust the seat angle on your HR due to the 2o" wheel or did you keep it as the plans state and just adjust your head tube angle?

Also, what type of shifters have you guys used on your HR's. I can't seem to see them on your's Greg (though I know they are there somewhere)

John Lewis
04-27-2009, 01:21 AM
Re: Clipless pedals. They are well worthwhile. You get better efficiency and avoid the dreaded leg suck. I My wife and I use them on all our bents. Expect to fall at least once through forgetting to unclip.:jester: I did! You don't need to unclip on a trike and I forgot when on my two wheel bent for the first time.

If you dont want to use clipless have a look at Power Grips. They work quite well and you can clone your own.

http://powergrips.mrpbike.com/product.php?section=product

John Lewis

comreich
04-27-2009, 09:14 AM
Mydriatic, for a 20"/406 wheel on the High Roller, tip the head tube back about 10 degrees. That's the angle on the Bacchetta Cafe and Giro 20. With the wheel and forks on (assuming a 26" rear wheel) the resulting head tube angle (HTA) should be in the 73 to 74 degree range (from horizontal).

Just for fun I put the 20" fork and wheel on my High Racer and, since I had put the head tube at 90 degrees, I came out with a 76 degree HTA but less than 1/2" of trail. Twitchy handling although it was ridable. If I were to put a fairing on the bike I would probably go back to the 20".

GregLWB
04-27-2009, 09:30 AM
Thanks for the advice,

I passed up 2 free bikes last year because they looked to crumby.

Greg. Did you adjust the seat angle on your HR due to the 2o" wheel or did you keep it as the plans state and just adjust your head tube angle?

Also, what type of shifters have you guys used on your HR's. I can't seem to see them on your's Greg (though I know they are there somewhere)

I did adjust the seat angle but it was to have a more 'closed' position. Later I cut and rewelded it to open up my seating a little more and it better balance the bike for me. For you I would build the boom and get a rolling frame and then have someone help you with holding boards in place until you find an angle that feels good to you and then measure that angle and weld the seat tube in place.

I am using Shimano 'Rapid Fire' shifters (8 speed) on the HR. I like them and have used the 7 speed version on my LWB bike for a couple thousand commuting miles (this set will get transferred to my TM this weekend). I am also using an 8 speed Shimano Mega-Range cassette on the rear (11-34) and I just changed the front crankset to an old Bio-Pace Elliptical triple ring on the front. I will be shortening my crank arms next from 170 to 160mm.

Greg

mydriatic
04-27-2009, 08:32 PM
Sorry I'm new to bike equipment. What is 1/2" of trail?

I contacted a local steel supplier. 24' of 1.5" square tube for about $49.

I have to check out plans for 1" tube because they only sell 24' lengths. That's a lot of tube. I also have to find a pickup to bring it home. 1 cut is free, but I'm psyched to have found a place willing to sell to me.

So Greg, you only have a total of 8 gears on your HR? I'm hoping for 18 (no real reason based on science). I did read Kid's thread on the streetfox and closed hub gearing but Being the simple guy I am, I'll stick to more is better psychologically for me.

Thanks for the tip on HTA. I was worried about finding the right angle. 10 degrees (I think I can do that).

I didn't know it had an adjustable BB. That makes it less stressful in getting the exact measurements. Though I wonder if I made it without adjustability if it would make the build easier.

Has anyone tried a rear suspension? I have the streetfox plans (book) and it would save me time building the rear triangle with the benefit of suspension.

Do people ask to ride your recumbents at rest stops?

Greenhorn
04-27-2009, 10:19 PM
Sorry I'm new to bike equipment. What is 1/2" of trail?

I contacted a local steel supplier. 24' of 1.5" square tube for about $49.

I have to check out plans for 1" tube because they only sell 24' lengths. That's a lot of tube.

Check onlinemetals.com and metalsdepot.com

trail is the distance between where your tire contacts the ground and the axis from your headtube angle. (Draw a stright line down the headtube angle until it intersects the ground. The distance between that point and where the front tire contacts is trail.) More trail = more stability but increased liklihood of wheel "flop."

mydriatic
04-27-2009, 10:46 PM
googling "wheel flop"

Ok, I think I got it and there is a lot more to this than expected.

I'll trust Com's 10 degrees. I like the looks of Greg's 26/20rig.

I think it'll make it easier to avoid the wheel - foot - chain interference.

Thanks for the continued tips. I'm hoping to put a fairing on it too- ambition is cheap. :cheesy:

GregLWB
04-28-2009, 01:00 AM
Sorry I'm new to bike equipment. What is 1/2" of trail?

I contacted a local steel supplier. 24' of 1.5" square tube for about $49.

I have to check out plans for 1" tube because they only sell 24' lengths. That's a lot of tube. I also have to find a pickup to bring it home. 1 cut is free, but I'm psyched to have found a place willing to sell to me.

So Greg, you only have a total of 8 gears on your HR? I'm hoping for 18 (no real reason based on science). I did read Kid's thread on the streetfox and closed hub gearing but Being the simple guy I am, I'll stick to more is better psychologically for me.

Do people ask to ride your recumbents at rest stops?

I just picked up 20' of 1.5 square tube for ~$25.

I have 8 gears on the back and 3 chainrings on the front (24 gears total).

Most people don't ask to ride mine but they stop me and ask a lot of questions.

Greg

mydriatic
04-28-2009, 08:50 PM
I just picked up 20' of 1.5 square tube for ~$25.

I have 8 gears on the back and 3 chainrings on the front (24 gears total).

Most people don't ask to ride mine but they stop me and ask a lot of questions.

Greg

Ah ha, that's what it means. I'm still new to bike terminology.

$20 for $24! I must be paying shipping costs. MA/RI must be too far removed from the steel belt. At least that is what I'll tell myself to make me feel better.

And installing shifters for the right chainrings and cranks is going to be another story.

TheKid
04-28-2009, 10:59 PM
I did read Kid's thread on the streetfox and closed hub gearing but Being the simple guy I am, I'll stick to more is better psychologically for me.


Around here, it's easy to get stuck in a high gear when you have to make a sudden stop, so internal gear hubs are a blessing. Still, if I had to pay for the 8 speed Nexus hub, I would stick with a regular 6 or 7 speed unless it was dirt cheap. I have a 7 speed derailler sytem on the LWB tadpole now, because the hub motor will have the same freewheel, and I won't have to mess with the chain when I put it on. I also went with a 3 ring crankset for now, just to get lower gears. Once the motor is installed, I'll go with a single ring up front just to keep things simple. On the DR, I was going to add a smaller ring to the front, or possibly get a front hub motor, because my disabilities have worsened, and it's getting harder to climb hills. But I found a 450 watt motor with gear reduction, so I'll install that instead. Meanwhile, I just tested a trike with a motor that has a single chainring and a single cog freewheel. (38tooth front, 20tooth rear) Once it's up to speed, it's easy to pedal without the motor. But the motor assist is just like having a multi geared system. You kinda give it all it's got when you start, and as you gain speed, ease off on the throttle until you don't need the motor anymore. When you encounter a hill, just give it a little juice, and it's just like switching to a lower gear. Very simple riding, no worries about being in too high a gear when making sudden stops. It's kinda like having an automatic transmission. When I put the motor on the LWB tadpole, I may go that route. As for the DR, it's too much work to switch to a single cog, but I'll probably remove the derailler and resize the chain to the center cog on the freewheel. The added benefit of the motor on the DR is positraction in the winter and on gravel or muddy roads.

mydriatic
05-25-2009, 08:53 AM
Update:
Ordered from onlinemetals and UPS delivered last week ...
somewhere other than my house. I called onlinemetals and UPS and await their investigation on where it was actually delivered. :confused:

I'm currently trying to rehab a 25+ year old DF Trek to use for the MS 150. I'm pretty sure I would not have finished the HR in time anyways.

mkane53
05-26-2009, 01:47 AM
Sorry to be jumping in on the clipless pedal debate late, but I use clipless pedals on all of my bikes. But if you're not used to using them I'm not sure I'd learn on a HighRoller. Might want to attach them to a wedgie for a while until you get used to the concept.

Actually I use a hybrid pedal that you can get either from Nashbar or from Performance Bicycle - one side is clipless; the other is regular pedal. I've used both the ones from Nashbar and from Performance and the ones from Performance seem to work a little better.

http://www.performancebike.com/shop/profile.cfm?SKU=2275