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View Full Version : Look what followed me home - Dillon Mark III



trikeman
03-29-2009, 11:36 AM
I put this here from the wooden seat thread in another section, so as not to hijack that one too much. More updates as I learn to use it.

A few weeks ago I went to look at some oxy-acetylene tanks and regulators a guy had for a good price on Craigslist. While I was there, he asked if I might be interested in an old torch. "Let me see it," I said and he pulled out this piece of Australian ingenuity:

http://www.atlantamusclecars.com/OxyWeld/MyDillon.jpg

He asked if I had ever heard of one, not knowing I had secretely lusted for one for years. I asked how much and he said $50, so it followed me home [g]. It works great. I just love finding hidden treasures at garage sales and the like and that little gem made the whole trip to his place worthwhile. I am just dying to try it on Al. I am still learning to use it on steel (welding and brazing). Experienced O/A welders tell me it can't it can't do anything my Smith AW1 airline torch can't, but I like having the whole kit in such a handy package. I don't know how many hours I have spent watching the videos here:

http://www.amweld.com.au/video_menu.htm

scootdaddy
03-29-2009, 12:00 PM
thats a cool torch got to try and find one of those (used of course cause I'm so dang cheap)

Keith

rickairmed
03-29-2009, 12:16 PM
Trikeman I am going to use a term of endearment we use on another group I belong to on a regular basis :D YOU SUCK . That looks just like a Henrob torch which I have lusted after for years . I watch them every year at the streetrod nats welding aluminum cans together with one of those little monsters . I just havent been ably to bring myself to hand over $400.00 bucks for the kit .


Rick

Odd Man Out
03-29-2009, 12:36 PM
Trikeman
Looks like a fun toy! I am looking forward to your use report when you get into AL with it. I am wondering if there is going to be a huge trial and error period to get the time/heat settings right. I hope to welcome another AL freak to the fold soon.

:rockon:

trikeman
03-29-2009, 03:07 PM
Trikeman
Looks like a fun toy! I am looking forward to your use report when you get into AL with it. I am wondering if there is going to be a huge trial and error period to get the time/heat settings right. I hope to welcome another AL freak to the fold soon.

:rockon:

OMO - Problem is I hear that learning O/A is a good way to learn to TIG, and a lot of guys on my welding forum seem to start with stick and O/A, move to MIG, and eventually succumb to the TIG disease. There may be no hope for me now lol. I wonder how much longer I can keep buying welding machines before SWMBO starts asking questions? Then again, I admire Brad's determination and success in dropping back to an AC only stick for all his builds.

I have been practicing a lot on 1" EMT with the Dillon. I feel like Greenhorn a few weeks ago blowing holes etc [g]. Man that thing puts out some heat for such a tiny machine. I waved it over an aluminum coke can and completely obliterated in in a flash lol. You do have to remember all over again about where to put more heat, and where not to, instead of just point the gun and pulling the trigger. Its all great fun though. Unlike TIG(?), you do have to use flux with O/A and Al, so I have to get a better lens to filter out the sodium flare. I just hate to send the Tinman $125 for one of those TM2000s, and may go with a Cobra instead.

Rick - yeah that $400 is a big deterrent. I would never have paid that for one. My hand did go into my pocket quick as a wink though when he said $50! I believe the guys that build a lot of homebuilt aircraft when they say its not any better than any other small "airline" torch, but I only have a few tips for my Smith AW1, and buying lots of tips get pricey at $30+ a pop. The Dillon came with everything you need. To find the Dillon for less than the cost of 2 Smith tips was a gift, and truly in the spirit of Zombie garage sale scrounging.

Odd Man Out
03-29-2009, 04:00 PM
OMO - Problem is I hear that learning O/A is a good way to learn to TIG, and a lot of guys on my welding forum seem to start with stick and O/A, move to MIG, and eventually succumb to the TIG disease. There may be no hope for me now lol. .

I checked out the vid on welding AL with it and the skills needed; torch in one hand, expendable in the other feeding is the same as TIG so I can see how it would help to develope the skills needed. The only other thing needed for TIG is the manipulation of the amperage with a foot pedal.

One of the things (among many) that I like about TIG is the fact that I can have my hands within an inch of the weld pool while welding -- this helps to do some very pretty intricate welds.

I took a TIG class at a community college over a summer and can't recommend it highly enough. It is THE way to go to learn TIG. I spent less than $300 to spend 8 hours a day for 4 days a week for 8 weeks learning to TIG the right way. Also all the argon and expendables were included in the tuition price -- a heckofa deal.

Finally, I must concur, there is no hope for you -- you are heading straight into the world of TIG. It is a great place and never needs flux.

GregLWB
03-29-2009, 04:01 PM
Trikeman - I know nothing about that type of welder but I do know that cool feeling you get when you find something at the right price that you have been looking for for years.:cheesy:

Happy for you.

Greg

John Lewis
03-30-2009, 12:57 AM
Hi Trikeman,

That's a great win. The Dillon became Henrob I believe.

The brilliant thing is they do everything in one including cutting I believe and to cap it off they are miserly on gas.

I've been chasing one for ages but the new price here is frightening.

John Lewis

trikeman
03-30-2009, 08:21 AM
The Dillon is quite heavy and clunky for anything but bench work. That is why many aircraft builders, who spend many hours a day welding in contorted positions on complicated tubing junctions favor a smaller torch. Here is a picture of my Smith AW1 between the Dillon handles (removed for picture) to show you how big and substantial the Dillon is.


http://www.atlantamusclecars.com/Handle.JPG

The Dillon weighs about 3 pounds.

fatfreddy
03-30-2009, 12:16 PM
HEY I have one of those HENROBS
They are sweet BUt in order to get the best us out of it.
You have to get a set of LOW Pressure Regulators.
AWE SHUCKS that's why it runs so hot.
The video and instructions said it would run on 4 and 7 lbs of pressure.
RIGHT.
and the GUY at the street rod meet said It TOO.!
Right.
But they don't tell you that you need a new set of regulators.
THAT IS THE KILLER "HITCH"
I was lucky I was selling some cool funny Teeshirts and he had a real lust for them. and oone of my pals wanted a henroob too.
SO we addopted that young man and our gals gave him a nice dinner and w drank with him through out the evening.
I learned all of his secrets and played with the Henrob at his booth for a couple of hours that evening .(after closing time)
BINGO on sunday we bought ours for $180 each...
It is a great tool if you love gas welding and cutting. IT will do every thing they tell you. BUT The trick is SLOW GOES the MOTION....
Not too SLOw but lsower than you are used to with normal tourches..
Very low pressures can't be held with a normal set of regulators..
THAT IS THE OUCH FACTOR..THAT IS ALSO THE PROBLEM .
Most guys buy that great kit,but don't want to get another set of regulators. SO it goes onto that top shelf .
where mine sat for a while and ahalf.maybe two whiles.
later
fatfreddy gotta go buy pipe.

KoolKat
03-30-2009, 12:26 PM
Again, we have a rule on this forum about using too many ALL CAPS in posts. Although we understand the need to emphasize on occasion, please limit your use of ALL CAPS. It means shouting, and we don't do that here.

fatfreddy
03-30-2009, 12:28 PM
HEY I"m sorry to burst anyones bubble about that DILLION. It's worth every cent of what you paid ,for sure you got a great tool. I'm like the newest guy at this forum.and i'll probably tick off every one beffore too long, so here is my PRE APPLOOGY.
I already love this web sight.and all the fun i'm having with this new kick in my life.
I'm going to hack me up a chopper in the next few weeks and i'll just have the most fun till i crash it.
Ireally dig that you guys and gals are sharing this space with me. Of course i was invited ,but you are allowed to kick me out later.
NICE to have this opportunity .thank you fatfreddy.

rickairmed
03-30-2009, 12:55 PM
Fatfreddy welcome to the Krew great to have a new member . You mentioned the streetrod show do you make it to the Nats in Louisville . I go every year myself granted I live here so its easy to get there :D.


Rick

trikeman
03-30-2009, 01:03 PM
You don't need a new set of regulators to run a Henrob or any other low pressure torch - you just need regulators that will hold the 4-5 psi on O2 and Acetylene that the torch requires. I have a set of the Cobra regulators that the Cuts-Like-Plasma site recommends. I bought them off eBay last year for a song. Guess what, they don't work any better than the big old regulators I have on my tanks. The only problem with large regulators is that they often have a low pressure oxygen gauge that is set up for high pressures, so you can't really read 4 psi on them, but you can buy low pressure gauge for it for $10. Not having a low-reading low pressure gauge is not a problem if you set up the regulator properly using the directions that come with the torch

A guy who I know on another forum welds all day long with small low-pressure airline torches, and he rebuilds regulators and torches too. He told me that a set of medium duty Smith regulators work better than the special regulators the Henrob dealers sell, because larger diaphragms are better at holding the constant low pressure. The reason large regulators sometimes "hunt" when set at low pressures is because they put a dampener on the control needle valve to keep them from humming at high flow rates. Any competent regulator repair shop can remove the dampener and install a spacer to keep them from hunting.

By the way the "special" Cobra regulators that the Henrob dealers sell for $140 each are made by National Torch and you can buy new ones for $75.

http://www.nationaltorch.com/Series2500.html

Just in case someone is interested.

fatfreddy
03-31-2009, 02:05 AM
Fatfreddy welcome to the Krew great to have a new member . You mentioned the streetrod show do you make it to the Nats in Louisville . I go every year myself granted I live here so its easy to get there :D.


Rick
HEY RICK ! I'm still getting confused about posting on this sight,so i hope every body bears with me. No I never ben to the nats in kentucky.But I lived 20 minutes from York,Pa and went to those shows for ten years and all the Carlisle shows.they were 25 minutes in the other direction. I was airbrushing cartoon tee shirts or selling my own screenprinted designs.and of course enjoying the shows.

fatfreddy
03-31-2009, 02:15 AM
You don't need a new set of regulators to run a Henrob or any other low pressure torch - you just need regulators that will hold the 4-5 psi on O2 and Acetylene that the torch requires. I have a set of the Cobra regulators that the Cuts-Like-Plasma site recommends. I bought them off eBay last year for a song. Guess what, they don't work any better than the big old regulators I have on my tanks. The only problem with large regulators is that they often have a low pressure oxygen gauge that is set up for high pressures, so you can't really read 4 psi on them, but you can buy low pressure gauge for it for $10. Not having a low-reading low pressure gauge is not a problem if you set up the regulator properly using the directions that come with the torch

A guy who I know on another forum welds all day long with small low-pressure airline torches, and he rebuilds regulators and torches too. He told me that a set of medium duty Smith regulators work better than the special regulators the Henrob dealers sell, because larger diaphragms are better at holding the constant low pressure. The reason large regulators sometimes "hunt" when set at low pressures is because they put a dampener on the control needle valve to keep them from humming at high flow rates. Any competent regulator repair shop can remove the dampener and install a spacer to keep them from hunting.

By the way the "special" Cobra regulators that the Henrob dealers sell for $140 each are made by National Torch and you can buy new ones for $75.

http://www.nationaltorch.com/Series2500.html

Just in case someone is interested. YEAH trikeman that all true too. MY noirmal regulators worked but i kept getting a warm handle. when i got some low pressure regs. that seems tostop. I sure didn't buy the est that the henrob guy was pushing. I didn't think they were worth the price. I'm really cheap .
I just managed to find a set on down the road from another racer guy..
I got that humming thing with my highpressure regs.
When you live 25 minutes from the CARLISLE shows it's like being able to walk into a whole city just for motor heads. up to 5000 vendors so they say.
If you can't find it there .your in the wrong hobby.