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comreich
03-13-2009, 10:49 AM
Well, my experimental lowracer* was disappointing me, so I decided to switch over to a high roller. Here's the progress so far. Should be interesting with the suspension fork. And the drop bars are just for working placement out. I'm going to get some 1" tubing or 3/4" EMT to bend up instead.

I've also thrown together a flip-it stem like on the Bacchetta's because the tweener bars will make getting on the bike a little challenging.

http://comreich.ods.org/~reich/highracer/2009-03-10_high_racer.jpg
http://comreich.ods.org/~reich/highracer/2009-03-10_flip_stem_2.jpg


* The lowracer frame is intact, waiting for some more inspiration and such.

Greenhorn
03-13-2009, 10:53 AM
Wow. That certainly looks nice, esp. the seat. It looks like you have a sliding boom --what are you using as a clamp on it?

comreich
03-13-2009, 10:59 AM
Wow. That certainly looks nice, esp. the seat. It looks like you have a sliding boom --what are you using as a clamp on it?

I'm leaning toward just welding it in there instead of making it adjustable. Nobody else will likely ride this, so changing the length isn't a huge deal. But if I decide to do so, it will be like my lowracer. A couple of short pieces of 1/2" tube welded to the underside about an inch apart. Then a slit cut through them and the main tube about 4" long and 1/4" wide. Put in a couple of bolts to pinch it closed and its done. I did the same thing on my trike, but I used seat post QRs to hold that shut. The tricky part is getting the short tubes square and level on a round tube :)

I'll probably also change the seat out at some point. When I put my feet down, the ends of the seat frame poke into the back of my thighs.

By the way, nice work on your highroller too. Looking forward to seeing how yours turns out.

GregLWB
03-13-2009, 11:19 AM
That certainly looks will look sleek.:) Nice job so far. How will you lock your stem so that it doesn't rock forward when you hit a bump?

Greg

comreich
03-13-2009, 11:33 AM
That certainly looks will look sleek.:) Nice job so far. How will you lock your stem so that it doesn't rock forward when you hit a bump?

Good question deserving a good answer. Unfortunately, I don't have one :) The flip-it stem on Bacchettas doesn't lock either, although it may have more resistance than mine, so I don't expect it to be a problem. Until I get this on the road, I won't really know. The other option is to cut off the flippy part, and build up a riser that clamps over the stem.

greenevegiebeast
03-13-2009, 11:33 AM
nice comreich, now keep the pics coming. when you ride it we want video.

Good job man

taloch
03-13-2009, 02:03 PM
That sure does look pretty with the round tube boom. Could you tell us what size you used and what gauge/thickness, as I would seriously consider rebuilding mine in round tube instead of square to get it looking that good.

More close-ups of your construction are most welcome. Keep the pictures coming!

:)

comreich
03-13-2009, 03:13 PM
Taloch, the main tube is 1 5/8" galvanized fence post from Home Depot :) -- 7 1/2' for about $15 CAD. According to the sticker it's 17 gauge and my calipers measure at a little over 1mm thick. Since the calipers aren't very precise, I'll take the sticker measurement as right.

I did the build in a slightly different order than Brad, due in large degree to the round tube. Instead of the rear forks first, I cut the hole for the head tube first and welded that in. I could then use that as the support in my workmate to try and ensure the forks were level and in plane. After welding on the rear dropouts I found I had to bend the (now) powerside stay down a bit to get the wheel vertical.

Hopefully tonight I'll get the chainline, and handlebars sorted a bit more and then on to brakes and derailleurs. And I'll make sure to take some more closeups, although I'm usually hesitant to show off my welding :)

trikeman
03-13-2009, 03:59 PM
Nice work. I don't know what it is about the round tube, but I agree that bicycles just look better in round. Maybe its just what we are used to seeing.

By the way, if the tube is 17ga steel, it should weigh almost exactly 1 pound per foot, which is about the same as the 16 ga 1.5" square tube. No real weight penalty at all. There looks to be about 4 feet of it.

I like your idea of welding the fork in first, then using it to line up the rear chain stays. If you put an axle or just a length of all-thread in the front fork dropouts and built a simple 2x4 jig, you could put the axle on the chain stays, tighten them up and drop it in the jig with grooves cut for the wheelbase. It would be so simple to line up and tack that a caveman could do it.

taloch
03-14-2009, 03:19 AM
Thanks comreich and trikeman for the sizes great tips on lining the whole thing up. I will definitely go with putting the head tube in first.

You can certainly pick up a lot of useful tips and info at the Atomic Zombies Garage Hackers hang-out.

I have some jobs I must do before I start on my re-build, but hope to finish those by the end of this month. In the meantime I can gather the materials, and clean/tidy the shed in preparation for it.

:)

trikeman
03-14-2009, 07:44 AM
For those that missed it and want to use a jig, here are some pictures of one in action from an old post. The jig is about 8 pictures down and the idea should work well with the HR. This guy also installed the front fork first.

http://mysite.verizon.net/teblum/HIGH%20RACER%20CLONE.htm

Even with a jig, it is important to weld a little on each side, then the other to avoid as much warpage as possible. After welding you may still have to straighten things up a bit, but that comes with the territory.

Mitdan
03-14-2009, 12:02 PM
Maybe most people know this or maybe not, or you might be old and forgot like I did, but you can make a template the same O.D. as the pipe and quarter it ( don't cut it ). Level the pipe in a vice and plumb the template at one end and mark the pipe. Do the same at the other end and then connect the dots. You now have points at 90 and 180 degrees to each other anywhere on the length.

Radical Brad
03-14-2009, 06:49 PM
Nice looking machine, thanks for the preview!

One thing I noticed...

Because your seat is adjustable at both hinge points, your entire weight will be taken up by only the joint between the end of the main boom and the fork legs being used as chain stays. no matter how tight the seat bolt are, they will add no strength to your frame and work like hinges as your tubing flexes.

If you weight more than 120 pounds, I would be weary of this joint holding out. Two small gussets about 4 inches long and 2 inches tall along each leg to the boom might help somewhat. Basically, it would be like changing the angle of the head tube on a regular bicycle to perfectly horizontal - the fork stem joint will now have to carry a lot of weight.

I could be just paranoid though, but thought I would mention that.

Brad

Greenhorn
03-14-2009, 08:48 PM
Brad: Would it matter if the rear was triangulated?

I am considering a similar set up for mine, but would weld a seat support bar like in the manual and then have the seat adjust off of the bar.

Radical Brad
03-14-2009, 10:06 PM
That would take the stress away from the fork leg joints for sure. I just don't think a pair of front forks can safely carry an adult welded parallel to the ground like that. ....Considering how little it takes to bend bicycle forks even in their regular almost vertical duty.

Brad



Brad: Would it matter if the rear was triangulated?

I am considering a similar set up for mine, but would weld a seat support bar like in the manual and then have the seat adjust off of the bar.

comreich
03-15-2009, 01:37 AM
Thanks for that caution Brad. I'll have to consider that and go take another look at the Bacchetta's because they do something similar to what I've done. Well, except for the seat mount which is significantly beefier than mine. I'm not crazy about this particular seat for this type of bike, so I'll be building something different.

And on that note, here's the update. The basic build is complete.
http://comreich.ods.org/~reich/highracer/2009-03-14_highracer.jpg

Something more akin to a build diary can be accessed here:
http://comreich.ods.org/~reich/highracer/index.cgi

More work needs to be done before I tear it down for painting, but the bike is rideable.

Radical Brad
03-15-2009, 04:06 AM
Lookin' great!

I am interested to know if the forks will hold up after riding down a curb or hitting a bit of a bump at speed. I looked at the Bachetta Corsa, and it looks like the stays are slightly larger and custom made. They probably have a heavier wall where it counts, and they are Cromo as well.

If you can ride it down a curb a few times without the legs bending, then I would say it passed the "drop test". The roads are almost as scary as the drivers around here so I do not build a frame that cannot survive the odd womp over a sewer grate or speed bump.

Look forward to the report.
Oh, and thanks for the mention on your site!

Brad

taloch
03-15-2009, 04:19 AM
That's looking really nice now comreich, and thanks for the build sequence of pictures.

I managed to get a new 2meter length of exhaust tube from the local tyre and exhaust fitters yesterday for 10. It measures 48mm OD x 46mm ID with a 1mm wall thickness. It is a bigger diameter than what you used but was all that was available to me.

I am getting excited now about re-building mine now and can't wait to start. I will stuff the whole front fork up the tube again for the rear chainstays, as I know this is plenty strong enough commercially. It certainly simplifies the build process too.

GregLWB
03-15-2009, 04:27 PM
Comreich - Dude, I love that dual pulley idea.:sunny: It looks great. I think I will do the same thing on mine. Thanks for sharing the build and pictures.

Greg

comreich
03-16-2009, 11:26 AM
Thanks for the input Brad, and I will certainly keep that in mind. The forks I used are chromoly, so they should be a little more resistant to folding on me. And I will, and do, gladly mention Atomic Zombie whenever I get the chance. You guys have been a great resource and inspiration in building.

Thanks Greg for the comments on the pulley. I wanted something like this from TerraCycle:
http://www.terracycle.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=T&Product_Code=WIKTC&Category_Code=IdlersALL

I'm a little concerned that I have a little too much drag from the pulleys as they might be too close to each other. I may also swap out the smaller one for another larger pulley to see if that makes any difference. And I probably need to add a chain keeper for the power side because the chain has a tendency to skip out when I backpedal which then causes the chain to derail from the front end.

Of course, the slow hill climb on Saturday is likely because the engine is out of shape and needs a steady course of LSD -- um, Long Steady Distance -- to see any improvement. Once I get the seat and tires replaced, the plan is for this to be my commuter bike, so I'll be getting a lot of hill climbing experience in.

GregLWB
03-16-2009, 11:44 AM
I'm a little concerned that I have a little too much drag from the pulleys as they might be too close to each other. I may also swap out the smaller one for another larger pulley to see if that makes any difference. And I probably need to add a chain keeper for the power side because the chain has a tendency to skip out when I backpedal which then causes the chain to derail from the front end.

Do you have a washer spacing between the pulleys?

Greg

comreich
03-16-2009, 01:24 PM
Do you have a washer spacing between the pulleys?

I do, but it may not be providing enough space. The bearings are recessed a bit, so it's possible that the pulleys are rubbing against each other even though the bushings are separated. That's the other thing I had to do. I needed reducing bushings in the bearings to convert them from 17mm ID to 3/8". And the bearings seem to have a higher drag as well. Could just be a high-drag situation all around.

If I get a chance tonight I'm going to swap out the tire with the slick on my trike and put it on the trainer to see how that feels. I think the biggest problem is still the fact that I'm out of shape and I'm not adjusted to the body positioning and muscle changes required by the relatively higher bottom bracket location.

comreich
03-17-2009, 11:02 PM
Since GregLWB's bike looked so good, I decided to copy his. Actually, the issue was that I wasn't comfortable with the high bottom bracket and the seat digging into my thighs. So I thought I should try swapping a shorter fork and 406 wheel. This required cutting down the head tube, so it was an all or nothing proposal. After riding it around the block a couple of times, I'm happy with the changes.

http://comreich.ods.org/~reich/highracer/2009-03-17_highroller_new.jpg

There is more explanation at the bottom of the main page:

http://comreich.ods.org/~reich/highracer/

trikeman
03-18-2009, 12:15 AM
Great job. I must confess I like the look of the high racer better, but those uber-high bottom brackets scare me.

I was in Home Depot tonight looking at those 1 5/8" fence posts. It was marked as 16 ga. Then, I went across the street and looked at them in Lowes. The ones in Lowes were marked 18ga. I don't know if they were any different. The one is HD was a dollar cheaper at around $9 as I recall.

comreich
03-18-2009, 09:13 AM
Funny how that works Trikeman. I really wanted the high racer too, particularly if I could have stuffed 700c wheels in there. But with the seat and the rear forks being a hair too short and other issues, going with the smaller wheel started to make some sense. I really wasn't crazy about cutting the head tube, so I rode around for a while without the upper headset bearing and decided that I liked the handling, so I made the switch permanent.

As for the fence posts, I know the sticker on mine reads 17 gauge, but my calipers measure 1mm. Since my calipers are just cheapies, they're not particularly accurate, but according to this site -- http://www.precisionsheetmetal.com/home/thickness.htm -- the difference from 18 gauge to 16gauge is 0.3mm (1.2mm to 1.5mm) so I suspect that I'm in the ballpark anyway. Either way, that helped make short work of this bike, so even if it's a hair heavier, I'm content ;)

trikeman
03-18-2009, 09:23 AM
I also noticed that most of the fence posts I looked at seemed to have a lot of small ripples in the surface. I could not tell from looking if it was from the zinc coating or ripples in the underlying steel. Have you noticed the same thing, and have you tried to smooth them out before painting? I would probably lean more towards glazing putty than a lot of sanding on a tube that thin if I wanted it glassy smooth.

Just be careful out there on it. I probably should not tell this story, but what the hey. A few months ago I decided to go out for a short test ride of something on my RANS Wave. Being scatter brained, I forgot to put on my helmet before I left. I realzed it before I got a few houses away from mine, but figured I would be careful and was only going a short distance on the bicycle trail anyway. I had never dropped it. Wouldn't you know it, I was starting off and trying to get clipped in and went down. Fortunatly, I fell over on the side of the trail into a fairly thick mat of leaves covering the ground. The wierd thing is somehow I fell right on top of my head, or at least that is the way it felt. It didn't hurt anything but my pride (I have a hard head lol), but the stupidity of riding even a short distance without a helmet on one of these things was reinforced. Of course I wasn't nearly as high off the ground as you would be with a High Racer. I expect going down on a high racer could be a nasty experience. I know it is from my DF road bike.

GregLWB
03-18-2009, 09:57 AM
Comreich - did lowering the front stop the seat tubes from digging into your legs?

On the pulley setup - have you tried running your grinder in the pulley channel? My pulley kept popping the chain out and I realized the chain couldn't run deep enough due to the V. I carefully, just a little at a time ground it out and the chain runs really smooth and doesn't hang up in the pulley any more (it also stays in the pulley groove).

I agree with some others that these bikes look really good with dual 26" tires but I think it's more important to ride something that is comfortable and makes you feel confident.

Great looking bike - can't wait to see it in 'color'.

Greg

comreich
03-18-2009, 10:04 AM
I haven't noticed anything really odd in the galvanizing, but I'll probably take it off with the flap disk anyway before painting. All my seats are EMT and I've only taken the galvanized coating off the cross bars and the points where they are welded, but that hasn't messed up the paint for me yet. The problem is usually my awful technique :)

And I certainly hear you on the helmet thing. I really should wear it even for the short runs around the block. And I've crashed enough to be a little wary. I don't know if it's just the way I crash, but only twice have I hit my head, and the worst was a full on face plant after my front wheel fell off (I was 12). The second I was wearing a helmet and I crashed going up a hill (WTF?) when my chain jammed.

Hey, how do you like your Wave? I know Rans discontinued it a long time ago, but seems like it was a neat little bike for it's time.

Greg, in a word no. The issue with the seat tubes was that I was getting poked when I was stopped, and with the seat height I couldn't move my legs far enough forward to plant either foot comfortably without getting jabbed. Now that the seat is lower, I still get jabbed a bit, but I can comfortably reach the ground which was the bigger problem.

As for the pulleys, that's a good suggestion and another modification that I'll make this weekend. But I think I found the source of my drag, and it may have been the elevation of the BB above the seat. With the front end change the BB is now at the same level as the seat instead of 8" higher. That 8" was radically different than my trike (2" difference) or my TE clone (BB 9" lower). When I went for a couple of test rides yesterday, the bike just seemed quicker and I could pedal up the hill a lot better than with the dual 26" configuration. My TE might still be a little faster up hill at the moment, but I expect that to change as I ride this more.

trikeman
03-18-2009, 10:13 AM
Hey, how do you like your Wave? I know Rans discontinued it a long time ago, but seems like it was a neat little bike for it's time.

Since I replaced that silly little 16" wheel on the front with a 20,' I like it. I still want to build a set of adapters for the rear so I can put a 26" wheel on the back, and have the aluminum I bought to do it, but its on the back burner. The RANS seat is heavy but very comfortable. By the way, I put the 16" wheel on the front of my DW and it works great there since it has three wheels and I am not worried about hitting a small rock and going down

trikeman
03-19-2009, 08:46 AM
I haven't noticed anything really odd in the galvanizing, but I'll probably take it off with the flap disk anyway before painting. All my seats are EMT and I've only taken the galvanized coating off the cross bars and the points where they are welded, but that hasn't messed up the paint for me yet. The problem is usually my awful technique :)



I read somewhere that if you let galvanized steel weather for 6 months or so the paint sticks a lot better. Its hard to know when you buy a piece how long its been out though.

comreich
03-27-2009, 12:24 AM
More progress, and a bit of a regression. I made up a new seat and mounted it on the bike and decided I wanted to see what it would be like with the 26" wheel on the front again. I like it. The problem is that I already cut down the head tube, and now the steerer on the suspension fork isn't threaded far enough for the adjustable bearing race to mate with the head tube :( Not to mention the ugly length of threaded tube sticking out, and the top nut not be able to reach the bearing race. But the bike rides nice, so I'll probably keep it this way.

With the new seat, I can also comfortably reach the ground and it doesn't dig into the back of my thigh like the other one. I'll let you try and figure out what the seat actually is, but you can also read up on it here:
http://comreich.ods.org/~reich/highracer/

http://comreich.ods.org/~reich/highracer/2009-03-26_highracer.jpg
http://comreich.ods.org/~reich/highracer/2009-03-26_highracer_seat1.jpg
http://comreich.ods.org/~reich/highracer/2009-03-26_highracer_seat_back.jpg

jimFPU
03-27-2009, 08:09 AM
A snow board huh? How did you bend it, and how much did it cost?

comreich
03-27-2009, 08:49 AM
Nuts. I knew I should have messed up the decal on the front :P. A snowboard, exactly. Actually, it's a cheap beginner's snowboard, intended for little kids. There are no edges, it's PVC or polybutylene (not sure which) and only has nubbed grips for the feet. And it cost me a whopping $20 CAD.

To bend it, I marked it out based on my original mesh seat, and then passed the flame of my MAPP torch along the line on both sides. You have to be a little careful because this stuff will burn. And after a minute or so, fold it up and hold it at the required angle for a minute or so to cool off. Voila! A recumbent seat. Unfortunately the plastic is really flexible, so I had to add an EMT frame underneath to hold. Seems to work pretty well though. And I like the built in fender.

trikeman
03-27-2009, 09:25 AM
Looks great. If it were mine I would probably ditch the suspension fork anyway, since they don't fit my speedy image :helmet:

Good idea on the snow board. It does look comfy. Now, to smooth it all out and paint it.

sksound5
03-27-2009, 11:21 AM
love the blaster, great name for the bike. Where did you get the idler? and how high is the seat from ground. Building for daughters and want to make sure not to big with 26" wheels. Thanks

comreich
03-27-2009, 12:20 PM
sksound5 thanks for that. Never even occurred to me. I think I've found the name for my bike :)

There are actually two pulleys on the hanger. Both are from here:
http://www.jwwinco.com/products/section13/vbip/index.html

The power-side pulley is the 4" and the slack side is the 2.5". The pulleys are sourced from Winco with 17mm bearings so I had to get two sets of 17mm to 3/8" reducing bushings. I was going for something like the dual idlers from TerraCycle:
http://www.terracycle.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=T&Category_Code=IdlersALL

As you can see, their prices are hideous and mine ran (including shipping) to about $50 CAD with two sets of pulleys, shipping and reducing bushings (bought elsewhere). Individually the pulleys are $7 each.

As for the seat height, I'm not really sure at the moment. I forgot to measure it last night. With a 20" wheel on the front, the seat was at 24" above the ground and the bottom bracket was the same. Judging by the picture, I'm expecting that the seat -- because I changed the mount as well -- is 27" off the ground, but the bottom bracket is now about 35" up. I'm 5'9" and when I put my feet down, I can't put them flat, so I suspect that you may want to consider 24" wheels or even 20" depending a) on your daughters' heights and b) whether you want symmetrical wheels. Going with a 20" front wheel (like GregLWB did) needs the head tube to go in at an angle of about 10 degress tilted to the back, but it gets the seat down so that legs don't have to be quite so long.

If you do consider going with 24" wheels be advised that finding smooth tires in that size may be a challenge -- and believe me, you want smooth tires. Even overinflated, the knobby tire I have on the front of the bike makes for noise and not so happy turning. 20" slicks are much easier to come by. Take a look at the Challenge Mistral for an example of a bike with 20" wheels.
http://www.challenge-ligfietsen.nl/publichtml/index.php?language=en&selection=tourfietsen-mistral-en

sksound5
03-27-2009, 03:45 PM
own a challenge hurricane, project is to stop 11y/o from stealing. she fits challenge fine

trikeman
03-27-2009, 04:01 PM
own a challenge hurricane, project is to stop 11y/o from stealing. she fits challenge fine

Nice size sprocket on the front of that Hurricane. How many teeth does the big ring have?

http://www.challenge-ligfietsen.nl/images/picture.php?filename=images%2Ffotos%2Fbikes%2Fhurr icane2009%2Fhurricane2009-001.jpg&size=900x599.83516483516&type=2&quality=87&unsharpmask=1&configurationfile=config%2Fpictureconfig.php&check=fc987d27b3578bd6511ea62c86b221e13c741159

comreich
03-27-2009, 04:50 PM
own a challenge hurricane, project is to stop 11y/o from stealing. she fits challenge fine

Dude, I'm afraid that you'll have to build the High Roller for yourself. Your daughter now has claim to the sweetest ride on the block :jester:

In all seriousness, I suspect that the High Roller with 20" wheels is going to come in closer to 21" for the seat height. I'll throw on the wheel from my son's trike, measure it up and post the results later. With the design, I don't think that you can get to the Hurricane's 15" seat height without cutting or bending the main tube as Challenge did. Can she stand over the Hurricane with lots of room to the seat?

GregLWB
03-27-2009, 06:35 PM
sksound5 thanks for that. Never even occurred to me. I think I've found the name for my bike :)

There are actually two pulleys on the hanger. Both are from here:
http://www.jwwinco.com/products/section13/vbip/index.html

The power-side pulley is the 4" and the slack side is the 2.5". The pulleys are sourced from Winco with 17mm bearings so I had to get two sets of 17mm to 3/8" reducing bushings. I was going for something like the dual idlers from TerraCycle:
http://www.terracycle.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=T&Category_Code=IdlersALL

As you can see, their prices are hideous and mine ran (including shipping) to about $50 CAD with two sets of pulleys, shipping and reducing bushings (bought elsewhere). Individually the pulleys are $7 each.

The double pulley setup I used on my HR are 4" pulleys for an exercise machine. They are really smooth almost noiseless and only cost $27 for the pair. I don't know if that's what you are looking for or not.

Greg

Here's a pic that shows the pulleys.
http://i694.photobucket.com/albums/vv301/gdfran0/HighRollerBike/Picture051.jpg

sksound5
03-27-2009, 11:37 PM
my hurricane has 64/50/34 in front. bought used from coworker whose husband added 3rd ring

Greenhorn
03-28-2009, 12:05 AM
Where did you get the pulley?


The double pulley setup I used on my HR are 4" pulleys for an exercise machine. They are really smooth almost noiseless and only cost $27 for the pair. I don't know if that's what you are looking for or not.

Greg

Here's a pic that shows the pulleys.
http://i694.photobucket.com/albums/vv301/gdfran0/HighRollerBike/Picture051.jpg

GregLWB
03-28-2009, 12:17 AM
Where did you get the pulley?

GH - I got it at a place called Exercise Warehouse here in Salem. I'm not sure if they have locations elsewhere. They usually sell the 3.5" and 4" pulleys for $15 a piece and they are made for the cables on exercise machines.

Hope that answers your question, if not let me know.:)

Greg

comreich
04-07-2009, 09:22 AM
Well, I finally got some more work done on the bike and updates posted at http://comreich.ods.org/~reich/highracer/. The gory details of what I did are there, but for previews, here are the pics:

http://comreich.ods.org/~reich/highracer/2009-04-06_highracer.jpg
http://comreich.ods.org/~reich/highracer/2009-04-06_highracer_2.jpg

Accessory Mount
http://comreich.ods.org/~reich/highracer/2009-04-06_hr_accessory_mount.jpg

Seat with Pad
http://comreich.ods.org/~reich/highracer/2009-04-06_seat_closeup.jpg

Rear Accessory Mount
http://comreich.ods.org/~reich/highracer/2009-04-06_seat_rear.jpg

GregLWB
04-07-2009, 09:36 AM
Well, I finally got some more work done on the bike and updates posted at http://comreich.ods.org/~reich/highracer/. The gory details of what I did are there, but for previews, here are the pics:


comreich - I like it! Have you had it out for a ride? I thought about doing the same thing on the front derailleur tube but got nervous about clearance and didn't. Seeing yours makes me wish I had.:jester: I also like that rear accessory mount. I can't wait to see it in color!:sunny:

Greg

comreich
04-07-2009, 11:14 AM
comreich - I like it! Have you had it out for a ride? I thought about doing the same thing on the front derailleur tube but got nervous about clearance and didn't. Seeing yours makes me wish I had.:jester: I also like that rear accessory mount. I can't wait to see it in color!:sunny:

Greg

Yeah, I was out a couple of times yesterday as I tweaked things. It was a little sluggish going up to the top of one hill, but I'm really sure that it's the engine that's not used to the workload :) Rolling down the hill was an exercise in braking, because the bike rolls really smoothly. Then I wired up the computer and rolled around our circle. I didn't pedal much, if at all, on the downward run and still coasted to a max of around 17mph. I'm really liking this bike.

If all goes well, painting comes this weekend. If it wasn't for the yellow seat and the white forks it would be pretty stealth all in black.

Update:
Greg, if you're worried about making the adapter, check this out:
http://www.terracycle.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=T&Category_Code=Acmts

Their adapters are inline with the derailleur tube and foot clearance isn't a problem.

Update 2:
Of course, when I kept looking, I found a cheaper alternative from TerraTrike:
https://www.terratrike.com/shop/accessories/accessory-mount/prod_34.html

I'm still looking for the one I've seen that slides into the derailleur tube, but either of these is a great solution as well.

Greenhorn
04-07-2009, 11:53 AM
Very slick looking. Nice work. I hope mine turns out that nice. You need different color foam though...


Could you take a closeup of the headset/stem or explain the set-up a little more?

Greenhorn
04-07-2009, 11:53 AM
Whats the weigh in?

GregLWB
04-07-2009, 12:34 PM
Update 2:
Of course, when I kept looking, I found a cheaper alternative from TerraTrike:
https://www.terratrike.com/shop/accessories/accessory-mount/prod_34.html

I have two of this style from a different manufacturer on my LWB commuter. They work pretty well, but I still like the ones you welded on better.:jester:

Greg

comreich
04-07-2009, 01:49 PM
Don't know about the weight yet, but that will be forthcoming at some point.

As for the stem/riser combination I'll get some pictures tomorrow (I'm busy tonight). In the mean time, here's hoping for a better description. The "original" stem is here:
http://comreich.ods.org/~reich/highracer/2009-03-10_flip_stem_2.jpg

I cut the angles off again to bring it down to ~22m all around. Basically it's a 22mm stem/quill with the quill cut off. Then I took a piece of 1" tubing, about 2.5" inches or so long, slipped it over the end of the stem and welded it on. At this point the binder bolt for the stem is about an inch below the top of the welded on piece. This way I can still get in to take the stem out of the steerer when needed.

To make the riser clamp, I took the the piece that was "originally" the flip-it part in the picture above and cut it down to around 3 or 4 inches. This was originally the seat tube from my mountain bikes and already had a tube welded on for the binder bolt. So I duplicated this at the other end with a short piece of 1/2" tubing welded on in the same orientation. The easy way to do this is to lay down the riser portion with the binder tube on the bottom and place the new tubing underneath at the other end. Once the new tube is welded on, cut a slit through it and the main tube. I should have drilled a hole at the end of the slit to relieve some stress and I will probably do this once I take everything apart for painting. The other thing I'll do is widen the gap a bit more so that there is more pinch and so tighten it up on the riser or stem.

The last piece is the new stem with the quill to hold the handlebars. This is just more of the 1" tubing that I clamped into the riser. By sitting on the seat with my feet on the pedals, I could figure out where the quill would go. Tacked it, double-checked it, welded it on and cursed my alignment :) The quill is actually off axis from the stem by about 1/4", but that's not enough to cause me any handling grief.

Hope that helps Greenhorn, but like I said, I'll get some pictures tomorrow to help explain it visually.

Update: My comment to widen the gap to allow for a tighter pinch on the upper portion of the riser turned out to somewhat prescient. I had the bike out for a ride today of about 8.2 miles and it was really good. Really quite fast on the flats, smooth roller down hills and not so bad going up. But when I hit the stop/start intersections heading for home, I found that I really needed to pull back on the handlebars to get started -- hopefully that changes with time. Anyway, the clamp at the top of the riser eventually loosened up and I had a couple of wobbly incidents where the stem turned but the wheel didn't. Fortunately I was within a couple hundred yards from home, so it wasn't a pain to walk the bike home. So, I have some more work to do on the riser. Not a surprise, but Greenhorn that's a critical piece of the bike, so if you do elect to make a similar stem make it tight.

comreich
04-08-2009, 11:38 PM
Greenhorn, as promised, here are pictures of the stem build:

The clamping riser. This is the part that needs to be able to be cinched down tight.
http://comreich.ods.org/~reich/steerer/riser1.jpg

Here is the steerer. You can see the expansion bolt for the original stem is below the level of the collar that was welded to the steerer.
http://comreich.ods.org/~reich/steerer/steerer.jpg

Here is how the two pieces mate together. The stem with the quill and handlebars slides in the top and is also cinched down.
http://comreich.ods.org/~reich/steerer/steerer-stem.jpg

Close up of the quill and upper steerer tube.
http://comreich.ods.org/~reich/steerer/stem.jpg

Had another ride today -- a little over 9 miles -- once the riser was reworked. Now I have to figure out how to keep the handlebars themselves from twisting. I suspect that if I rough it up some more it will get better, but it's a little disconcerting to start at a light and have the handlebars move on you. The other thing is that the bike is quite twitchy even with a fairly slack head tube angle. I may try switching the 20" wheel and fork back on to try it out. But it looks like Friday is the day to tear it down and paint it. Like Greg, I need to put a rack on it so that I can start commuting next week.

GregLWB
04-09-2009, 12:14 AM
The other thing is that the bike is quite twitchy even with a fairly slack head tube angle. I may try switching the 20" wheel and fork back on to try it out. But it looks like Friday is the day to tear it down and paint it. Like Greg, I need to put a rack on it so that I can start commuting next week.

comreich - I once read an article by Fast Freddy Markham (the easyracer guy) that helped me with the twitchy feeling on my LWB bike. Drop the pressure in your front tire 5 lbs at a time (I'm assuming that you're using high pressure tires) down to about 85 lbs. It worked on my LWB bike but your results may vary. I do know that my SWB with the 20" wheel is really stable even with the high pressure tire.

Greg

trikeman
04-09-2009, 03:49 AM
That is one sweet looking ride. Those new handlebars really look great. I can't wait to see it painted.

comreich
04-13-2009, 07:46 PM
Okay, it's almost done. The bike and seat frame have been painted black; the handlebars, risers and seat supports are silver. Really has a bit of a Judge Dredd or a Police Bike vibe going on. Unfortunately, since I've finished it to this stage I haven't had a chance to ride it.

http://comreich.ods.org/~reich/highracer/2009-04-13_highroller.jpg

The seat pad has since been velcroed to the seat so it sits a lot better. And the funny black orb on the derailleur post is a 55W driving light I picked up -- a pair of lights with wiring harness was $5 at Princess Auto :). Plenty bright, but it should suck up my 3.2Ah battery over the course of my commute to work.

http://comreich.ods.org/~reich/highracer/2009-04-13_highroller2.jpg

Looks like I need to tie wrap the wire for the computer as well. The last addition is to be a rack for commuting and hopefully I can find one tomorrow. I'd like to ride this in to work this week as a bit of inspiration for one of my cubicle-mates because he's heading in for back surgery and he hopes to be riding again after the surgery.

If you want more gory details, head on over to the updates here (http://comreich.ods.org/~reich/highracer/).

greenevegiebeast
04-13-2009, 08:15 PM
is that a auto fog light, how are you going to power that??

GregLWB
04-13-2009, 10:20 PM
And the funny black orb on the derailleur post is a 55W driving light I picked up -- a pair of lights with wiring harness was $5 at Princess Auto :). Plenty bright, but it should suck up my 3.2Ah battery over the course of my commute to work.

comreich - That is looking really good!:sunny: Especially the yellow seat!:jester::jester:

Does your light use the little halogen bulb that cars use or does it use MR -11 bulbs like a track light? If it uses a MR - 11, I can give you the details on my set up. I use two Driving lights that came with 50 watt MR - 11 bulbs from Walmart ($15) and found some 20 watt Xenon 'Narrow beam' Spot bulbs (only a 7 degree spread) and use a 12 volt, 9 AH, AGM battery. I get more than 3 hours on one light, or if it is really dark and rainy and I'm using both I get more than 2 hours of light without over draining the battery. If you want more details let me know.

Greg

comreich
04-13-2009, 11:22 PM
GVB and Greg, yes, the headlight is an automobile driving light -- not a fog light. And thanks Greg for the heads up about the bulb. I just pulled the second one apart and found that it's a 35W MR11 bulb which means I can easily find smaller bulbs for the thing :) I just found listings for both 10W and 20W bulbs for $6 and $7 each, so replacing the bigger bulbs won't be too terribly expensive.

As for powering it, I have two 3.2Ah SLA 12V batteries that I picked up to power the lights. I'll put the second lamp and battery on my LWB after I find a charger for the batteries. The rig doesn't add a lot of weight, but boy does it light up the garage.

One bit of a downer for me on the bike though. I weighed it tonight and, without even being fully rigged for commuting, it tips the scales at ~44lbs. I'm sure a chunk of that is the heavy suspension forks, but until I find another set of forks to accept the stem, I'm stuck with it. Oh well, that just means that uphills will continue to be a lot of work, and downhills will be lots of fun :)

GregLWB
04-14-2009, 12:34 AM
GVB and Greg, yes, the headlight is an automobile driving light -- not a fog light. And thanks Greg for the heads up about the bulb. I just pulled the second one apart and found that it's a 35W MR11 bulb which means I can easily find smaller bulbs for the thing :) I just found listings for both 10W and 20W bulbs for $6 and $7 each, so replacing the bigger bulbs won't be too terribly expensive.

comreich - make sure you get the spot beam (<12 degree). The flood beam won't shoot far enough ahead of you.:)

Greg

TheKid
04-14-2009, 04:10 AM
Great work. Love those bars. Also some good lighting info here. I was going to use normal bike lights on my LWB tadpole to save battery power, but now I see I don't have to. I have some MR 11/16 sockets, so I can make a couple of fixtures out of cans. I'll be using a 12v 18ah battery for the lighting, which is all LED except the headlights. I found these bulbs, and ordered some for the headlights:

http://www.1000bulbs.com/Front-Glass,-12-Volt-20MR16,-Halogen-Light-Bulbs/8897/

GregLWB
04-14-2009, 09:54 AM
Great work. Love those bars. Also some good lighting info here. I was going to use normal bike lights on my LWB tadpole to save battery power, but now I see I don't have to. I have some MR 11/16 sockets, so I can make a couple of fixtures out of cans. I'll be using a 12v 18ah battery for the lighting, which is all LED except the headlights. I found these bulbs, and ordered some for the headlights:

http://www.1000bulbs.com/Front-Glass,-12-Volt-20MR16,-Halogen-Light-Bulbs/8897/

Kid - those wil be perfect. I use the 7 degree focus to throw the light even farther but that is on my motor assisted bike where I am going close to 30 mph most of the time. The ones you found are less expensive and will give you plenty of light. I also have a tail light connected into the same battery set up that is a 3 LED Trailer/Camper marker light. It remains steady on and my Planet Bike Superflash is attached a couple feet higher.

I used Project Boxes from Radio Shack to mount the battery in (with foam around it to protect from vibration) and also to wire my switch setup. I put a two pin flat connector between them so that all I have to do is disconnect that and plug in my charger. I can take pictures if you are interested.

Also, the main reason I have the pair of lights (most of the time I only run one) is so that if one bulb breaks I can switch the other on and still get home safely.:sunny:

Greg

TheKid
04-14-2009, 11:46 AM
Thanks Greg. I already have my battery mount with a foam padding, and a fuse box for the wiring. I still have a few terminal blocks from the old days. I also wired both the motor battery and the light battery for charging. A switch shuts power to the controller, and another gives power to the charger. I just have to plug the charger into receptacle, and I'm good to go. I'm planning on building the headlights, side marker, and turn signal/parking lights into the fairing. I have golf cart taillight/turn signal/brake light units and side markers for the tailbox.
Now all I have to do I finish the fairings so I could hook all this stuff up.

I like the driving lights on Comreich's High Roller. If I find them at that price around here, I'll use those instead.

comreich
05-03-2009, 11:34 AM
I've had my high racer out riding with my daughter back and forth to my in-laws for about 10 miles total riding at a time. Yesterday I took it out for a much longer ride -- to the office and back. The route is 12.5 miles one way with some moderate climbing. When I used to ride a lot -- about 8 years ago -- I could do this route in 45 minutes, so I wanted to see what I was up against on the high racer.

Started out at 8:50 with a bit of a headwind and about 12 C. Nice weather for a ride. And pretty uneventful too. The high racer is nice and stable over the distance but I really need to get comfortable with riding it slowly. But where it gets really interesting is starting at lights, and there are a fair number of them. I suspect that at 5:30am there won't be much stopping, but the return route at 4:00pm will be much heavier trafficked and lights will become an issue. I guess practice is the order of the day :)

Overall, I made it to the office in 52 minutes (GPS timed; the cyclecomputer was probably a little less) which is pretty good considering my conditioning. As I get stronger the speed will definitely come up.

One of the advantages in my building is that we have a bike cage in the parking garage so I rode down the ramp and around the garage to orient myself with where the locker rooms are. Getting out was much more of a chore. There is a pressure switch to activate the door and my bike and I are far too lite to activate it. And since the security call button is at the bottom of the ramp, I had to walk the bike out :(

The ride home was equally uneventful except for the higher traffic count. About five minutes from my in-laws (25 minutes from home by bike) I finally had an "event". I was just starting off at light when my chain snapped :( And since I didn't carry my chain tool (now to go into my tool kit), I had to walk/coast the bike down hill to my in-laws place and call my wife to come get me. I left the bike and later today will go fix the chain and ride it home.

So, all-in-all, a decent ride for when I was. I think I'll commute three days this week to keep from killing myself too much and then this will be a regular ride. If I'm feeling especially silly, I might try putting the 20" forks back on and seeing how different the ride is with a lower front end. It might lend itself to putting a fairing on like the Lightning F40 :)

One other issue reared its head as well. My hands, especially the right one, were getting numb by the time I got to work. It might just be that I was gripping the bars a little tight, so hopefully familiarity will allow me to relax on the ride.

alecw35
05-04-2009, 06:39 PM
might be that your arms are up from your body and the bloods draining from them

or maybe your gloves are tight

comreich
05-04-2009, 11:45 PM
Good suggestion alec, and I suspect it's that I'm not used to holding my arms like that for long. On Saturday I didn't wear gloves as it was warm enough not to. On the first official commute today, I had less of a problem despite wearing gloves in the morning. This afternoon coming home, my hands were fine. Granted, I had to start and stop a lot more, so it may just be the need to keep them moving.

GregLWB
05-05-2009, 09:37 AM
comreich - just to rule it out you might want to try tilting your handgrips lower and seeing if a slightly different angle might be more comfortable or a more natural angle for your wrists.

Glad to hear that the official commute went better.:sunny:

Greg

comreich
05-05-2009, 11:36 AM
Yeah, the commute home was a riot :) Had two cars come up along side and the occupants mentioned that they liked my bike*. And it turns out that I was heading home just as the schools were getting out so there were lots of "Cool bike!" shouts from the kids as I rode by. And the best part was that, since I stick to the middle of the lane owing to the generally bad state of the road, pretty much everybody passed me in the other lane. Only one old guy in a pickup wasn't too keen on that and passed me a little too close for my liking.

I have some cabling and shifting issues to work out, but otherwise the bike is well up to the challenge and I'm getting more comfortable on it every ride. Thanks again Brad for such a great design.


* My wife likes to think that the one woman who commented on my bike was actually expressing appreciation for my butt :rolleyes4:

alecw35
05-05-2009, 05:26 PM
I get sore hands on most of my bikes. Think its my bad habit of holding the brakes a lot. Tensing my arms up. I wear gloves most of the time. Used to be that one bike made the left arm sore. And another one made the right sore.
I shake my arms every so often. Try to hold on as lightly as I can. Move my hand along the grip a bit so they arent in the same place all the time.

trikeman
05-10-2009, 11:59 AM
Started out at 8:50 with a bit of a headwind and about 12 C. Nice weather for a ride. And pretty uneventful too. The high racer is nice and stable over the distance but I really need to get comfortable with riding it slowly. But where it gets really interesting is starting at lights, and there are a fair number of them. I suspect that at 5:30am there won't be much stopping, but the return route at 4:00pm will be much heavier trafficked and lights will become an issue. I guess practice is the order of the day :)

......

One other issue reared its head as well. My hands, especially the right one, were getting numb by the time I got to work. It might just be that I was gripping the bars a little tight, so hopefully familiarity will allow me to relax on the ride.

I pretty much took the winter off from riding, but not eating, and have been trying to be more conscientious for the last month now, mostly riding my LWB almost exclusively. I've gotten really slow (mostly because I am 50 pounds over weight).

I have been averaging 12 mph over my regular 25 mile course on my RANS, but the stopping and starting is killing me. Until I clear the highly urbanized areas on my bike trail, I have intersections about every 2 miles. Since my feet are way out in front on the LWB, and my head is at the back, its hard to see if cars are coming anywhere near as easily as it is in my upright. Add to that the fact that I have to downshift to a really low gear before stopping, or I will never get going again without falling over, and intersections kill my times. Old ladies on mountain bikes can pass me at intersections!!

Its not like I need to be anywhere at a certain time, but I hate having wedgies pass me like I am standing still. Most of them simply slow down a bit at road crossings and look both ways before illegally shooting across without waiting for a cross light. I can catch and pass the less fit ones, but as soon as we get to an intersection or a moderate hill, they get me back. I have never liked taking big chances at crossings like some wedgies do, but at least on my upright, I only lose a few seconds before I catch them again.

Yesterday, I had had enough and decided to dust off and ride my road bike today. Its been so long since I was on it, it felt really strange and unstable for the first few miles. I can cruise 2-4 mph faster on the road bike, even after months of layoff. I crossed safely at intersections, but it was easy to see if anyone was coming by looking both ways without stopping. Even if I didn't gear down, I could get going again, simply by standing on the pedals.

The downside is that my butt is sore today, and I was in agony on the way home. I am coming to hate intersections on my LWB.

Odd Man Out
05-10-2009, 12:25 PM
The downside is that my butt is sore today, and I was in agony on the way home. I am coming to hate intersections on my LWB.

I guess you need to make the decision as to which is worse... it would be a no contest decision for me. No pain ever for anywhere near my gluts thank you:punk:

GregLWB
05-10-2009, 12:44 PM
Its not like I need to be anywhere at a certain time, but I hate having wedgies pass me like I am standing still. Most of them simply slow down a bit at road crossings and look both ways before illegally shooting across without waiting for a cross light. I can catch and pass the less fit ones, but as soon as we get to an intersection or a moderate hill, they get me back. I have never liked taking big chances at crossings like some wedgies do, but at least on my upright, I only lose a few seconds before I catch them again.

Yesterday, I had had enough and decided to dust off and ride my road bike today. Its been so long since I was on it, it felt really strange and unstable for the first few miles. I can cruise 2-4 mph faster on the road bike, even after months of layoff. I crossed safely at intersections, but it was easy to see if anyone was coming by looking both ways without stopping. Even if I didn't gear down, I could get going again, simply by standing on the pedals.

The downside is that my butt is sore today, and I was in agony on the way home. I am coming to hate intersections on my LWB.

Time for a Tourmaster! On my other LWB commuter it sat similar to yours and I had some of the same issues (not the slow part because of the assist motor). I can't begin to tell you how much I love riding my TourMaster!:sunny: I know it isn't as cool and streamlined as some of the other bikes but I draw 10 times the attention on it than on my old LWB or my HR. Every time I stop somewhere it draws a crowd! Some because of the engine but even more about the frame. They all want to know how much it was so that they can go buy one!:jester:

Hands down the TM is the best combination of speed, absolute comfort, balance, and visibility I have ever ridden and that includes all the DF bikes I have ever owned. My 2 cents.:jester:

Greg

comreich
05-11-2009, 12:20 AM
Well, my commutes have come to an end for a while -- I was laid off on Wednesday. Not a total surprise, and I'm mostly to blame. But it's not something to dwell on.

Anyway, Saturday I took a longer single ride than my commutes had been -- 20 miles on an out-and-back. If you're interested in looking at it, here's a link at MapMyRide.com:
http://www.mapmyride.com/ride/canada/ab/calgary/972124188960066889

There was a fairly strong headwind on the outbound leg, and as I turned onto the highway I passed a DF rider who I had been following at 20+mph. Of course, he had stopped to fix something so I could pass him easily :) But for the next ten miles he stayed behind me, even up my last climb of the leg. When I turned around to go home, I waved to the guy and it was pretty obvious that the head wind had beaten him up probably worse than it had beaten me which I think is a testament to the aero characteristics of 'bents.

The ride back was definitely faster, but not significantly so. Unfortunately the headwind on the out was not a tailwind on the back. And it was worse when I turned north again. At the end, 20 miles in 1h 20m.

I still haven't licked the right hand going numb, but I am able to drop my hand and let it recover every couple of minutes.

Now for the goals. Next month a couple of people from church are organizing a ride up Highwood Pass here in Alberta. For an idea of what this looks like, see this:
http://www.mapmyride.com/ride/canada/ab/calgary/706051546

Up to 7% grades and 32 miles out over the highest paved pass in Canada. The cool part is that the road is closed to vehicle traffic until the middle of June, so we'll be riding on an essentially empty road. The decision to be made is whether I swap narrow tires onto my LWB, get another narrow tire for my highracer and work on my climbing, build an Easy Racers Javelin clone (probably not going to happen :)) or get back on my DF which I've used before on that same ride. I'd love to do the ride on a bent just for the ride down. :rolleyes4:

The other goal is sometime this year I'd like to make the ride from Calgary to Banff which is about 70 miles, and there are some good climbs on the road as well. That's probably an August or early September project so I've got some time to prep.

trikeman
05-11-2009, 07:13 AM
Sorry to hear about the job situation. Its happened to most of us at one time or another in our lives.

Congratulations on the ride. 20+ mph is smoking for 20 miles without drafting. I'd love to get back to that level of fitness, but even in my prime riding days when I was only 50 I think around 17 was about as fast as I could do for that long solo. 10 more years and 50 more pounds has done me in lol. Of course I can so something about the latter. Your HR is doing you proud.

My hands used to get numb on long rides. Wrapping my handlebars with cushioned handlebar tape helped some. Riding a lot helped more as my hand got used to the vibration.

GregLWB
05-11-2009, 09:56 AM
Sorry to hear about the job.

The rides you have planned sound like a lot of fun. And there aren't many things better than watching some guy on a DF in a superhero outfit try to keep up with a bike you built from scatch for probably 1/10 the price.:jester:

Greg

comreich
05-11-2009, 10:53 AM
Trikeman, there was no way I was doing 20+mph for the whole 20 miles :) It was only for about a mile while we had a tailwind. Once we turned the corner for the long stretch we had a headwind and that dropped the average a lot. I was climbing one hill at just above 7 mph, but I could easily tell it was shallowing out as the speed climbed to a whole 11mph. I managed to catch 38mph on a fairly short downhill close to home.

And as for the superhero costume Greg, let's just say that my yellow jersey and black tights would have made me the butt of jokes here :cheesy: Add to that blue shoes and helmet and I look like a paint store erupted. At least I wasn't wearing my black and dayglo-green shorts or I would have seriously looked like this fellow :jester:

And thanks for the condolences on the job front. I have a couple of leads already and I'm heading in to see the career counselor in a couple of minutes. Severance was pretty good, so we're not in any trouble for a while, and we've learned how to better manage than when this happened six years ago.

trikeman
05-11-2009, 11:09 AM
Trikeman, there was no way I was doing 20+mph for the whole 20 miles :) It was only for about a mile while we had a tailwind. Once we turned the corner for the long stretch we had a headwind and that dropped the average a lot. I was climbing one hill at just above 7 mph, but I could easily tell it was shallowing out as the speed climbed to a whole 11mph. I managed to catch 38mph on a fairly short downhill close to home.

.

ROFL. You shouldn't have told me, even though I feel better about my sorry physical condition now. You made me feel so inferior yesterday that I kicked it up a notch on my 25 miles this morning on the LWB (no way my butt could ride the DF today). I managed to get the average speed up to 13.5 mph, but I did stop the computer when I had to wait for a light.

GregLWB
05-11-2009, 11:18 AM
And as for the superhero costume Greg, let's just say that my yellow jersey and black tights would have made me the butt of jokes here :cheesy: Add to that blue shoes and helmet and I look like a paint store erupted. At least I wasn't wearing my black and dayglo-green shorts or I would have seriously looked like this fellow :jester:


ROFLMBO!:jester: I love the paint store comment!:jester: I'll cut you some slack on the SuperHero outfit, but only because you built the recumbent you were riding!:jester: LOL!

Greg

mydriatic
05-11-2009, 09:45 PM
Love the bike! Another inspirations for me (plus good tips for finding pulleys) Good luck with the job hunting. The job market in RI/MA- USA aren't great either.