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View Full Version : Ballpark weight of Highroller?



yangmusa
12-31-2008, 01:26 PM
The weight of the completed bike will of course depend on many things, like the wheels, crankset etc. But with the mild steel main frame, it's going to be relatively heavy, right? On the other hand, the frame is so simple so maybe it isn't? Have any of you weighed a finished bike?

I'm considering building one, so I'd be curious to know!

pcorbett
12-31-2008, 03:24 PM
My wife is a Weight Watcher leader so I used her portable scale. Now I have to find a way to get the tread marks off it before " she who must be obeyed " finds out.

The 24" HighRoller = 38.5 lbs.
Meridian = 45 lbs.
TourMaster = 55.5 lbs.
HammerHead Trike (with dog basket and cargo shelve) = 64 lbs.

I was going to weigh my TallBike but that was way to scary by myself so I weighed my wifes Burley Tandem (with rack and bags) = 50.5 lbs , just to compare with the LWB recumbents.

Oh yeah, I weighed myself. I gots to quit the ringdings :eek:

The're all good rides!

PC

yangmusa
12-31-2008, 03:56 PM
The 24" HighRoller = 38.5 lbs.


Ouch, heavy!

The 'bent I have now is 27 lbs, and it feels like a lead pig going uphill. I'm guessing the Highroller is better suited to the flatlands than here in hilly northern California. Too bad, it looks really cool :(

pcorbett
12-31-2008, 04:23 PM
Us flatlanders here on Cape Cod just have glacier hills to deal with, not mountains. I have not found the HR to be a pig. Maybe a racoon with an attitude but not a pig. The TM is more like a beached pilot whale or is it a stick in the mud? Hard to say they smell the same! It sounds like your doing well with the store bought, why build.

Pete

yangmusa
12-31-2008, 04:48 PM
why build?

Just fancied building something and having fun, s'all! Plus my current bike is more touring oriented, and I fancy a high racer with a more laid back seat for higher speed. I do a lot of rides with guys on upright racers, and I'm pretty much always last up every hill. When I ride my upright I can keep up, so I know it isn't my fitness that's lacking ;)

I wonder if it's possible to build using 4130 cro-mo instead of mild steel? Too hard to weld for a beginner?

pcorbett
12-31-2008, 05:07 PM
Exellent. Go for the HighRoller and throw on some speed wheels and such.
Don't worry about the weight, It's all good.
Welcome to the Krew

Pete

trikeman
12-31-2008, 07:30 PM
Just fancied building something and having fun, s'all! Plus my current bike is more touring oriented, and I fancy a high racer with a more laid back seat for higher speed. I do a lot of rides with guys on upright racers, and I'm pretty much always last up every hill. When I ride my upright I can keep up, so I know it isn't my fitness that's lacking ;)

I wonder if it's possible to build using 4130 cro-mo instead of mild steel? Too hard to weld for a beginner?

4130 welds just like mild steel. The only thing is that you are supposed to heat treat it after you weld it, but I know a lot of guys building stuff don't and many say they have no problems. Some also use special rods or wire. Apparently it is supposed to get somewhat brittle if you don't heat treat. You can just heat it up with a torch and let it cool to treat it. WIth the thin stuff we weld some say its a waste of time. I have welded it without problems (or post heat treat) with my MIG and no problems. Unless you are getting the Chromo from old bikes, I can't see the expense justifying it over mild steel for a small weight savings.

Dang - I am surprised the HR weighs 38 pounds, but I guess that big steel main frame is heavy. Thanks for weighing it PC. I already have my wheels for it, but haven't started on it yet. I was thinking it would be light like my good road bike :mad: Its still a lot lighter than my DW.

Odd Man Out
12-31-2008, 07:43 PM
Ouch, heavy!

The 'bent I have now is 27 lbs, and it feels like a lead pig going uphill. I'm guessing the Highroller is better suited to the flatlands than here in hilly northern California. Too bad, it looks really cool :(

What gears are you runnin? That will make a huge impact -- I have had the good fortune to ride some of the best recumbents out there and now ride the DeltaWolf as my main. I find that the shape of "the engine" makes the biggest impact after the selection of gearing for the sense of the ride. I may be slower on my DW than I was on my souped up RANS V-Rex but I am smiling more and enjoying the ride more. I am plenty fast but am realistic enough to know that someone out there will always be faster. I guess if I was looking for the ultimate in speed I would torture myself with a carbon fiber diamond frame...

pcorbett
12-31-2008, 08:26 PM
All my bikes that I have made were not made to save weight. All my bikes are made to satisfy my need to build things, to see how things work, to pi$$oF# my neighbors, frighten and intimidate, to put a smile on a face, to wipe a smile off a face. The things you see me do or hear me say may not work for you. I have many bikes that I ride just to ride. Enough of the glory.

In my most humble opinion the HighRoller is the bike to make light. What are you waiting for, give it a shot, I'd like to see it.

waiting for pictures

Pete

Edit: Trikeman, it was a pleasure to go out to the garage to set these bikes up on end on the scale. I wanted to see for myself. Funny thing was, I had the HammerHead trike standing on it's hind quarters nearly by itself. Stable on one as it is on three, the Pug's bike.

Radical Brad
12-31-2008, 09:07 PM
That HR weight does seem high to me. I will weigh mine when I have the chance, but know it is about the same as my decent quality mountain bike.

Brad

trikeman
01-01-2009, 10:49 AM
I was surprised at the weight too, but as I look at the specs on the Bacchetta Giro 26 it makes sense. At 31 pounds, the Giro 26 is not a "high-end" performance bike (intended more as a cruiser) so they probably didn't use the lightest components. Add to that the fact that the 31 pound Giro is with light(er?) Recurve half-mesh seat, skinny 1.25 tires, etc and there you have it.

http://www.bacchetta.com/recumbents/bikes/giro26.htm

I am guessing with some care in component selection and a mesh seat you could get the HighRoller down to 31 pounds.

pcorbett
01-01-2009, 07:42 PM
I am guessing with some care in component selection and a mesh seat you could get the HighRoller down to 31 pounds.

I agree. My 24" HR was not made with weight saving anything in mind. Quick and dirty with a touch of cheap. Microsoft's secret moto " Get it out now, we'll fix it later".
After Brad said it was maybe chubby? and he said it like a true parent, I checked what was on this sled.

I used one bike that was on the side of the road with a free sign on it. I think thats what it said.

It has 160 steel crank arms on it that would make a decent mooring. Along with it was those 24" rims with knobby tires. The tubeing was slighty smaller and thicker. Heavy valve caps.

I think you could make it 31 pounds. But money makes the mare go faster. My cost was the welding rods. My theory was anyone could make a HighRoller in their garage for nearly nothing and come out with a nice riding bike. My welder I made from microwave transformers that I rewound from free wire. If you ever wanted in your life to make something thats worth making, you have come to the right place.

Contest1: Who can make the lightest and fastest HighRoller that won't break and spit you on the ground.

Contest2: Who can make a HighRoller.


All winners here.:rockon:


PC

trikeman
01-01-2009, 08:23 PM
Yeah at least you got one done, which is more than I can say for the one I bought the wheels for. I agree with that MS motto, which I always heard as:

Make it run
Make it fast
Make it right

Somehow MS often doesn't get to the last two parts. LOL.

I love the way the Bacchetta marketing department spun the fact that theirs is a bit "chubby," compared to their more expensive bikes.

It's the perfect solution for recumbent riders that love the dual 26" recumbent format for commuting and hardcore touring, without all the touchy-feely super lightweight components found on its roadie brethren. This bent is all about taking on life day to day; ride it hard and put it away wet, the Giro 26 will be there tomorrow ready to go again and again.

Yeah right! I mean who would want all those "touchy feely super lightweight parts on a $1695 bike? You must have at least $5-$10 in yours, depending on what you pay for rods LOL.

trikeman
01-21-2009, 10:05 AM
Here is an old 2003 account of one man's quest to get a HighRoller type bike (Bacchetta clone) below 30 pounds. Interesting.

http://mysite.verizon.net/teblum/HIGH%20RACER%20CLONE.htm

Geeze he was 63 then and had a goal of a 20 mph average cruise speed. I wonder how he is doing on it?

pcorbett
01-21-2009, 05:59 PM
I have not seen that old article from 2003 and I had thought I'd seen them all. This guy surely had it going for him back then. I did see some of the same questions we ask. He answered some of them.

1. Iím tall enough that I decided to go with 700C wheels.

(I love that answer. We're over that one now.)

2. I forgot to mention that sometime back I bought a Dotek Triple Crankset, 155 mm, from Mark Stonich

(Got the crank size down too.)


3. Anyways, Tough S---!! When itís done, it weighs what it weighs.

(He's like a brother to me.)

4. Weight of the bike is below thirty pounds. Repeated weigh ins show 28 or 29 pounds. I may remake the seat. I know I can save 1 pound there. Call me weight-weeny if you will.

(Damn, he did it. Where is this guy now? Still riding I hope.:wheelchair:)


Pete

trikeman
01-21-2009, 06:34 PM
I don't know if he is still going, or not. His name is Tom Blum, and he used to post on www.cyclingforums.com. I don't think he has posted there since late 2006. Some of the work these guys did before us (without cookbooks like we have here) is amazing. Hope he is well.

Greenhorn
01-21-2009, 06:48 PM
I found that site before stumbling in here.


I have not seen that old article from 2003 and I had thought I'd seen them all. This guy surely had it going for him back then. I did see some of the same questions we ask. He answered some of them.

1. Iím tall enough that I decided to go with 700C wheels.

(I love that answer. We're over that one now.)

2. I forgot to mention that sometime back I bought a Dotek Triple Crankset, 155 mm, from Mark Stonich

(Got the crank size down too.)


3. Anyways, Tough S---!! When itís done, it weighs what it weighs.

(He's like a brother to me.)

4. Weight of the bike is below thirty pounds. Repeated weigh ins show 28 or 29 pounds. I may remake the seat. I know I can save 1 pound there. Call me weight-weeny if you will.

(Damn, he did it. Where is this guy now? Still riding I hope.:wheelchair:)


Pete

Greenhorn
01-21-2009, 08:08 PM
I wonder how that hoseclamp seat attachment works?

I would think that be be a) unstable or b) scratch the paint.