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lumo
08-11-2008, 01:17 AM
how do you guys weld?

do you use
o - oxy-acetylene
o - shielding gas
o - arc welding

just curious ;)

greetings

lumo
08-11-2008, 03:20 AM
as i am not a mechanic ill try arc welding in the next couple of days/weeks
i was at a friends home whos using oxy-acetylene and shielding gas
but the results he brought were not what i expected (and the "toys" are expensive and use load of space)
therefore i look forward to arc welding (electric welding - i hope i translated that right.)

i want to create a StreetFighter but will try to weld a simple scooter before, further i am not sure if i should buy the plan for the streetfighter cause of:

The StreetFighter is made mostly of standard bicycle components and square steel tubing, with only two small parts that need to be machined.
its a pain in the a$$ to get machined parts where i live! you pay too much for machined parts IFF you are able to get em. i fear to run into a price where i could buy a motorized car for it ;)

Gerald_G
08-11-2008, 08:35 PM
I use a very inexpensive Arc welder from Princess Auto (Canadian company), and 3/32 rods. I'm not very practiced, and most of my welds need touching with the grinder. I'm not sure if it's the equipment or the operator. Either way, they are strong, and I'm having fun.

trikeman
08-11-2008, 08:43 PM
its a pain in the a$$ to get machined parts where i live! you pay too much for machined parts IFF you are able to get em. i fear to run into a price where i could buy a motorized car for it ;)

I know the advertisement for the plans say, The StreetFighter is made mostly of standard bicycle components and square steel tubing, with only two small parts that need to be machined, but I can't figure out what those two small parts are. My guess is there is a work around.

The StreetFighter is basically a DeltaWolf backend with a StreetFox front end. Neither one of those requires any machined parts if you don't mind welding a freewheel to the axle (that is the way I did it). You also have to weld together some 1/8" tabs and drill and grind them on the StreetFox, if you want to call that machining.

Maybe I am missing something ?

TheKid
08-11-2008, 08:58 PM
The disc brake mount. The machined part on the DW is the freewheel adapter, the KC and Streetfighter have the freewheel/disc adapter as macined parts. The second machined part for the Fighter is the adapter without the freewheel threads. I assume Brad did this to make the rear end more symetrical.
On the Fighter, the disc adapter can be made the same way as the DW. The freewheel/ disc adapter can be made by making a disc adapter and welding it to a left side BB cup, or threaded hub and flange.

trikeman
08-11-2008, 09:02 PM
The disc brake mount. The machined part on the DW is the freewheel adapter, the KC and Streetfighter have the freewheel/disc adapter as macined parts. The second machined part for the Fighter is the adapter without the freewheel threads. I assume Brad did this to make the rear end more symetrical.
On the Fighter, the disc adapter can be made the same way as the DW. The freewheel/ disc adapter can be made by making a disc adapter and welding it to a left side BB cup, or threaded hub and flange.

Ahh OK. So on the Streetfighter and KC there is no workaround like there is on the DW? Bummer.

lumo
08-12-2008, 01:06 AM
The disc brake mount. The machined part on the DW is the freewheel adapter, the KC and Streetfighter have the freewheel/disc adapter as macined parts. The second machined part for the Fighter is the adapter without the freewheel threads. I assume Brad did this to make the rear end more symetrical.
On the Fighter, the disc adapter can be made the same way as the DW. The freewheel/ disc adapter can be made by making a disc adapter and welding it to a left side BB cup, or threaded hub and flange.

a friend of mine buys the plan for me (i think he already did last night) as i do not own a credit card.
i wonder if its possible to order an adapter at atomiczombie or if someone else could ship it?

edit: a freewheel adapter is? the thing on my bike gear, so you do not have to pedal all the time?

gbbwolf
08-12-2008, 02:10 AM
Ok I have all 3 plans in front of me the streetfighter, the delta-wolf,and the kyotocruiser.

Any of these can be made simply using a standard rear bike hub.
Only caveat being that for the 3/4 axle you will need to drill out the hub adapter.

As far as disc brakes go a simple disc brake adapter can be made with a 2.5 inch washer and a shaft collar for 3/4 inch axle.

I built my delta-wolf with 3/4 axles.

I did buy a freewheel adapter from elliot, simply because they were relatively cheap, and I didn't feel like drilling hardened steel.

But I think if you use a left side bottom bracket the hole may be big enough, that you dont have to drill it out at all.

If you don't want to drill your hardened steel part to 3/4 at home take it to a machine shop and have them do it.

It would be lots cheaper than having the part machined.

FYI if you chose to have the part machined expect to shell out about 75 to 100 clams.

Nelson

TheKid
08-12-2008, 02:39 AM
The BB cup hole is 11/16", not difficult to drill or file out to 3/4".
A freewheel adapter is a piece that allows you to screw on a single or multi cog (sprocket) freewheel and mount it to a trike axle. The threads (American) are 1 3/8" - 24 threads per inch. The threads are the same as the threads on a rear hub for BMX or 5-7 speed bikes. The American bottom brackets also use this size thread, the left side being right hand threaded, the right side is left hand threaded. That's why you'd use the left side BB cup to make the adapter. For the DW, if weigh 250 pounds or less, (Unless there's someone out there heavier who used 5/8" axles and had no problems) and don't plan on adding a motor, you could use 5/8" (16mm) axles. There are commercially available freewheel adapters that size, though they're getting scarce. There's also a 15mm adapter that can be drilled out to 16mm without too much trouble. It's a 10 dollar part. Then all you need is the disc brake adapter. You want a washer that fits snugly on the axle, then use the disc as a template to drill the six holes for the bolts. You could weld this onto the freewheel adapter. I made one up using a hole saw to cut the disc adapter, then drilled the center hole out to 5/8". I welded that to a freewheel adapter I bought a while back. Here's the disc adapter:

http://forum.atomiczombie.com/showthread.php?goto=newpost&t=860

TheKid
08-12-2008, 02:44 AM
Here's the two adapters welded together:

http://i192.photobucket.com/albums/z66/edpol_photos/Disc%20Adapter/000_0384.jpg

Freth
04-07-2009, 12:59 PM
I use a MIG welder with flux-core wire ... no gas ... plenty of splatter. Oh, and an auto-darkening helmet. Fairly inexpensive, one-time investment. It has been great for Automobile doors, bicycle carts, and recumbents. Chromoly tubing requires TIG welding ... I leave that up to my buddy Jack.

Zwolf
04-07-2009, 01:12 PM
Not that I have quite started yet, but I'm a TIG welder. I have a Miller TIG/Stick machine and the stick electrodes are still in the plastic packaging, I should open those one of these days. Was using it at another shop for a while till the place fell out from under me. I also use a standard welding helmet, not one of those fancy auto darkening ones. My welding table is a 1/4 sheet of 1/2 inch plate on top of a pair of metal legs I found on the side of the road.

Currently sitting on my hands waiting for the guy that's building my shop to actually show up. So far he's only an hour late... that seems about normal for contractors around here...

trikeman
04-07-2009, 01:13 PM
Chromoly tubing requires TIG welding ... I leave that up to my buddy Jack.

Better not tell that to all the old guys who O/A welded airplanes from Chromoly during the war and the thousands doing it since then.

I currently use O/A, MIG, fluxcore, and stick, but so far O/A is my favorite. I haven't tried TIG yet.

taloch
04-07-2009, 04:45 PM
I mostly use TIG but I get the rods out for heavy work. I initially got the TIG inverter years ago, for building World War One aeroplane rudders for a mate who sells them to collectors. Think The Red Barron here! Thin steel tube, canvas and dope. I make about a dozen or so a year for him, and in between I do odd jobs that come along, and maybe a bike frame or two as well.

I can O/A, MIG, Braze and silver solder, but haven't any of that kit at home, only the TIG/Stick inverter. I like the TIG because it is so quiet, just like O/A without the heat spread, and very precise. I can get really close to see what I am doing without the helmet glass getting sprayed with metal. I call it civilized welding! No clean up either, apart from a polish with the wire brush.

I have never used an Auto Dark helmet at home, using the flip down type serves me well. We used them all the time at work, but I can't really justify me buying one now but I am sure they have come down in price over the last 10 years.

Before I stick weld I too put some rods under the grill to dry them. They perform more smoothly and strike up better. I don't think I would want to weld with damp rods with all the associated noise and splatter it causes. The TIG/Stick inverter smooths and quietens the arc as well, so a decent weld results with more control too.

Nice thread! Keep it going. I am sure there are lots of tips out there waiting to be told.

rickairmed
04-08-2009, 01:05 AM
Mostly Mig with C25 gas although I am thinking about playing with trimix this summer and some stainless :D.

Rick

comreich
04-15-2009, 02:54 PM
I run a Lincoln MIGPack140 with flux-core. Or as I like to describe my welds -- the hot glue gun method. Maybe that's why my highracer weighs so much :)